PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -- It happens every summer. Trees crash down on houses; giant branches smash cars like cupcakes.

Monsoon storms pack a powerful punch.

[ARIZONA'S WEATHER AUTHORITY: Arizona monsoon 2019]

"Last year, we had a pine tree that fell over, and when the storm came, it was 60 mph winds," said Robert Dillingham of Jason's Tree Service. "It actually lifted the tree with the root ball and clipped off a corner of a person's house."

Lisa Staken lives in north Phoenix just off Central Avenue, where she's surrounded by tall trees that could be vulnerable to blowing over.

[RELATED: 20 places in the Phoenix-area likely to see worst monsoon damage]

"We know what can happen," she said. "The winds can be very strong. We see that kind of thing happen all the time."

Last summer, a viewer sent Arizona's Family video the moment high winds snapped a palm tree in two.

[RELATED: Arizona's Family unveils new weather vehicle: Storm Commander]

[CHECK IT OUT! Storm Commander prepared for monsoon 2019]

But there is something homeowners can do to keep their homes, cars, and property safe from the monsoon -- trim back trees now, before the heavy winds, dust and rain roll in.

According to tree experts,  thinning trees and clearing away dead bark and branches will significantly reduce the amount of force from the wind and keep a tree from toppling over.

[WATCH: How to protect your property!]

"It can save you a lot more money getting trees trimmed, versus it coming down on your car or house or structure," explained Jeremy Hertenstein of Harris & Sons Tree Specialists.

[WATCH: Monsoon 2019: An Arizona Weather Authority Special]

Jason Barry is best known for his Dirty Dining Report which airs Fridays at 6:30 p.m. on CBS 5.  He is also the storyteller behind CBS 5's Pay It Forward which airs every Thursday at 6:30 p.m.
 
 


Copyright 2019 KPHO/KTVK (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.

 

Reporter

Jason Barry is a nine-time Rocky Mountain Emmy Award winner who is best known for his weekly Dirty Dining reports highlighting local restaurants with major health code violations.

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(2) comments

lancelot

Why are you using the term "owner" azfamily. This has been deemed offensive and unacceptable. Please be more sensitive in future articles.

Melons

[rolleyes]

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