As football season heats up, so does the perfect tailgating pastime- cornhole. One Valley couple has decided to give up their 9 to 5 to cultivate the competition in Arizona.

"You can have an adult beverage while you play," said Erin Kisicki. "I don't know any sport you can do that with." When you ask Erin Kisicki and her husband, Todd Kisicki, what they love about cornhole, the list is long.

"It's one I think that brings people together from all walks of life," Erin Kisicki said.

"It's an easy game to learn, tough to master," Todd Kisicki said. Todd Kisicki has paused his college professor career at ASU's teaching school to focus full-time on their business, KB Kornhole.

[RELATED: Competitive cornhole: The fastest growing 'sport' in Phoenix]

"I've always wanted to be my own boss," Todd Kisicki said.

"Like all great businesses, it started in the garage with our family," Erin Kisicki said. She still works full-time as a social worker.

"I love the idea of doing cornhole with a cause," she said. Together, they organize tournaments for fundraisers, team-building, and festivals. But there is one part of the gig they've given up.

"We found early on we were terrible at making boards by hand, so we found a board-maker," Erin Kisicki said. For KB Kornhole, football kick-off also kicks off their busy season.

"From September 1 through the middle of June, we’re busy every weekend," Todd Kisicki said.

But for players like Doug Zafft, the sport has grown beyond the backyard barbecue. He practices all the time.

"A few times, a week and playing a lot every weekend," Zafft said. Last year, he was the Arizona Player of the Year. This year, he's going pro. The Kisicki's Todd and Erin are working to get these players sponsorships, and ESPN is set to televise American Cornhole League competitions.

Erin and Todd are realistic about both working together and starting their own business.

"Very tough at times, a lot of sleepless nights when you wake up," Todd Kisicki said. But they say the 60-plus hour work weeks are worth it to create a cornhole community in the Grand Canyon state.

"It brings people together over something pretty universal that everyone can participate in," Erin Kisicki said.

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