PHOENIX (3 On Your Side) -- As businesses, churches, and schools continue to rely on video conferencing during the coronavirus pandemic, cybersecurity experts warn that we might not be taking enough precautions to safeguard against hackers.

Adam Levin, a cybersecurity expert and the founder of CyberScout, says one of the first things to consider to ensure a secure meeting is restricting access. He suggests using a video conferencing product that has a new PIN for each session. Every person attending the meeting should be identified by name, email address, and phone number.

Video conferencing

Video conference users also should pay attention to cameras on devices, even post-meeting. Levin says hackers can take control of your camera and record things that are happening in your home without you realizing it.

"Who cares if you see me cooking? Other things? Maybe I don't want you to share my bathroom experience," Levin said. "It's one of those things that's so simple. Put a piece of tape, a Post-it note, or get a camera cover which you simply slide over your lens."

Camera privacy cover slide, webcam cover for laptop

"It's one of those things that's so simple. Put a piece of tape, a Post-it note, or get a camera cover which you simply slide over your lens."

It's also important to ensure the background of video conference calls is as neutral as possible. Even something like a college diploma or a family photo could give scammers enough personal information about you to commit fraud.

"Let's say a document with your Social Security number on it, or your newest piece of artwork, which is incredibly valuable," Levin said. "Or you're waving your newest piece of jewelry and saying look, 'I just got this new piece of jewelry!' If the wrong person got into that video conference, there might be somebody that shows up at your doorstep that you won't want to be there."

 

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