PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) - The Department of Public Safety helicopter crew that rescued a BASE jumper whose parachute got caught on the surface of the Superstition Mountains says it one of the most challenging rescues of their careers. "Everybody has to be on the same page when we're doing something like this, or it's just not successful," Trooper-Pilot Scott Clifton said.

[WATCH: DPS crew talks about high-risk rescue]

The BASE (building, antenna, span, and earth) jumper was dangling at least 600 feet above the ground, and the crew was racing against the clock. "He was on the phone with 911 saying, 'My chute is tearing!' So, we knew we had to get in there pretty quick and get somebody down there to secure him," Clifton said. The jumper also told dispatchers that the right side of his body was going numb.

[RAW VIDEO: Base jumper rescue in the Superstition Mountains]

DPS troopers realized it would take too much time for the ground crews to make their way up to the jumper, so they had to fly the helicopter in and hoist a rescuer down to him.

"Being the one that goes down there, I felt like we were going to have to deal with and get the parachute off him at some point, and that was going to create a potential entanglement hazard," Trooper-Paramedic Russ Dodge said. "We were also concerned about the rotor wash and wind causing more damage, so we kept a really close eye on the parachute as we were approaching."

[RELATED: DPS releases video of base jumper rescue in the Superstition Mountains]

The crew opted for a harness, which is often used for water rescues. "The device that we're using, it's used for speed," explained Trooper-Paramedic Craig Bremer, who operated the cable from the helicopter. "It doesn't necessarily have all the safety components that we use with some other devices, but it allows us a little bit more ability to be quicker."

"What it does is, it gives you the opportunity to just reach around, get something clipped on them and tighten it up, and we automatically have them attached on," Dodge said. "At that point, we buy some time to do what else we need to do."

From the time the helicopter crew initiated the rescue until they had the jumper up on top of the mountain was about 15 minutes. The team says this was one of the more dangerous rescue operations they've been on, but it's nothing they haven't trained for. "These are the most dangerous because the potential for failure usually ends up in a fatality," Dodge said. "A lot of times they'll be supported, or they'll be on a ledge of some sort. This one, just free-hanging with a nylon parachute up there, was a little bit different and a little bit more challenging."

Superstition Fire & Medical evaluated the jumper once he was back on the ground. He did not have any injuries.

PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) - A helicopter crew with the Department of Public Safety (DPS) rescued a base jumper whose parachute got caught on the surface of the Superstition Mountains, claiming it one of the most challenging rescues of their careers. 

"Everybody has to be on the same page when we're doing something like this or it's just not successful," said Trooper Pilot Scott Clifton. 

The base jumper was dangling at least 600 feet above the ground and the crew was racing against the clock. 

"He was on the phone with 911 saying, 'my chute is tearing!' So we knew we had to get in there pretty quick and get somebody down there to secure him," Clifton said. 

The jumper also told dispatchers that the right side of his body was going numb.

DPS troopers realized it would take too much time for the ground crews to make their way up to them, so they had to fly the helicopter in and hoist a rescuer down to the jumper. 

"Being the one that goes down there, I felt like we were going to have to deal with and get the parachute off him at some point and that was going to create a potential entanglement hazard. We were also concerned about the rotor wash and wind causing more damage so we kept really close eye on the parachute as we were approaching," said Trooper Paramedic Russ Dodge. 

The crew opted for a harness that is often used for water rescues.

"The device that we're using, it's used for speed. It doesn't necessarily have all the safety components that we use with some other devices but it allows us a little bit more ability to be quicker," explained Trooper Paramedic Craig Bremer, who operated the cable from the helicopter.

"What it does is, it gives you the opportunity to just reach around, get something clipped on them and tighten it up and we automatically have them attached on. At that point we buy some time to do what else we need to do," said Dodge.

From the time the helicopter crew initiated the rescue until they had the jumper up on top of the mountain was about 15 minutes. 

The crew says this was one of the more dangerous rescues they've been on, but it's nothing they haven't trained for. 

"These are the most dangerous because the potential for failure usually ends up in a fatality," Dodge said. "A lot of times they'll be supported or they'll be on a ledge of some sort. This one, just free-hanging with a nylon parachute up there was a little bit different and a little bit more challenging." 

Superstition Fire & Medical evaluated the jumper once they were brought back to the ground. He did not have any injuries. 

 

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