First Alert Weather: Parts of Flagstaff no longer under ‘shelter-in-place’ order due to monsoon

Homeowners who live along burn scars in Flagstaff are taking every precaution they can as rain comes down in the High Country.
Published: Jun. 29, 2022 at 2:59 PM MST
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FLAGSTAFF, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) — It appears neighborhoods in Flagstaff have avoided any severe flooding due to the monsoon. A “shelter-in-place” order was in place for Mt. Elden Estates but it was lifted around 4:30 p.m. A flash flood warning that was issued for new wildfire burn scars north of Flagstaff has also expired. Light rain fell on the upper part of the Pipeline Fire but no damage has been reported. Areas that was burned by the Museum Fire three years ago got up to an inch of rain but there hasn’t been any flooding down to the neighborhoods. Officials say mitigation work has helped. Rain is tapering off, but more could occur throughout Wednesday night.

On Thursday evening, residents were still preparing for possible flooding as rain started falling in Flagstaff. “In a flash of a second it could all be gone, and what are you going to do? You can’t fight fire and you can’t fight the water,” said Julian Borrego, preparing his home with sandbags.

Areas that was burned by the Museum Fire three years ago got up to an inch of rain but there hasn’t been any flooding down to the neighborhoods.

Officials are worried about flooding due to the Pipeline Fire which burned over other established burn scars. With little established bushes and trees, the areas are more susceptible to flooding.

“The house is okay kind of up on the deck, but it blew out my overhead door for the shop and filled that with rocks, boulders logs, everything,” said Michael Diamond, who dealt with that flood damage along the Pipeline burn scar last time there was severe flooding. ”It’s like being on the river, running rapids on the river. It just really comes loud with this big roar. It’s something else when it’s really coming.”

Residents are still keeping a watchful eye in case of severe weather alerts. “It may be sprinkling and then the next hour it could be 3 inches of rain and that’s the scary part because you don’t know if it’s going to come and go or what,” said Borrego. “You just keep an eye on the weather reports and watch the sky. That’s the key! When the mountain disappears in the rain, then you know we’re in trouble.”

An Arizona's Family viewer sent us a video of rain causing some flooding in Flagstaff.