One year after Jan. 6, where do the cases of Arizonans stand?

A year after the Jan. 6 attack at the United States Capitol, hundreds of cases have been filed...
A year after the Jan. 6 attack at the United States Capitol, hundreds of cases have been filed against people for their involvement, but few of those cases have been resolved.(Arizona's Family)
Updated: Jan. 5, 2022 at 9:51 PM MST
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PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) — A year after the Jan. 6 attack at the United States Capitol, hundreds of cases have been filed against people for their involvement, but few of those cases have been resolved. At least seven of those cases involve people who are from Arizona.

U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland said Wednesday those cases have had investigators reviewing more than 20,000 hours of video footage and more than 300,000 tips from citizens. More than 700 cases have been filed on people from 45 states and the District of Columbia, according to research by the Program on Extremism at George Washington University. Most of the cases filed are for people from Florida (76), Pennsylvania (63) and Texas (63). The program’s research found 22% of the total cases linked to Jan. 6 have pleaded guilty.

Former U.S. Attorney for Arizona Paul Charlton said the prosecutors have chosen who to prosecute first. “Those who assaulted officers are going to get the most severe sentences as they should, and that prosecutors hope will act as a deterrent for those who think about acting similarly in the future,” Charlton said.

One of the most infamous Arizonans to be charged is Jacob Chansley, known as the QAnon Shaman, who has been sentenced for his involvement. Chansley pleaded guilty to obstructing the Electoral College proceedings and was sentenced to 41 months in prison.

James McGrew, from Glendale, was identified by a King James tattoo on his stomach and is charged with attacking police officers. Federal court records show McGrew is in custody in the District of Columbia but has no trial date set. Nathan Entrekin was dressed as a gladiator and recorded videos for his mother is facing charges including violent entry and disorderly conduct.

Former U.S. Marine Micajah Jackson was tracked down by distinct bright gloves and flannel shirt. Jackson entered a guilty plea to parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building and faces up to six months in prison. A sentencing hearing is set for February.

Arizona siblings Cory and Felicia Konold face weapons and disorderly conduct charges for their involvement on Jan. 6. They have both pleaded not guilty.

Tim Gionet, who calls himself “Baked Alaska,” was living in Arizona in 2021 when he was arrested in connection to the Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol. He claimed to be a member of the media, but authorities said he entered congressional offices, cursed at police and encouraged other protesters not to leave the Capitol.

Former U.S. Attorney Paul Charlton said bringing misdemeanor charges against many of the protesters is a smart move. He said he is not surprised to see more serious charges. “If I am to charge someone as a prosecutor with sedition, it means that I have to look into their mind understand what it was they were thinking and exactly why it is they entered the Capitol building,” Charlton said. “It’s much easier for me to say I saw you assault a police officer because I watched it on a video.”