Advertisement

New ADOT North-South Corridor would create traffic relief for Southeast Valley

Arizona Department of Transportation says they have selected a 55-mile North-South Corridor...
Arizona Department of Transportation says they have selected a 55-mile North-South Corridor through Pinal County that would not only help relieve traffic from Phoenix to Tucson, but it would also better connect areas of the Valley.(Arizona Department of Transportation)
Updated: Aug. 23, 2021 at 10:10 AM MST
Email This Link
Share on Pinterest
Share on LinkedIn

MESA, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -- Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) has selected a 55-mile North-South Corridor through Pinal County that would not only help relieve traffic from Phoenix to Tucson, but it would also connect areas of the Valley.

ADOT is looking to connect those who live in Queen Creek, San Tan, and the overall congestion along the I-10 to Tucson along the 55-mile stretch that would go from the US-60 and Ironwood to Eloy along the I-10.

“The purpose of the North-South Corridor study is to enhance the area’s transportation network to accommodate the current and future population and employment growth, improving access to future development and other centers of activity, improving regional mobility, providing an alternative to and reducing congestion on Interstate 10, improving north-to-south connectivity and integrating the regions transportation network,” according to a press release from ADOT.

Garin Groff from ADOT says it’s a big project that could take years but the effort is worth it.

“This is a big corridor. It’s 55 miles, all the way from US 60 in Apache Junction down to Interstate 10 in Eloy. This is a corridor that ADOT has been studying for a number of years to improve north south connectivity as well as serve future growth in the area,” says Groff. “We’re looking at this corridor both for the current transportation needs and for the population growth and the growth of businesses that we expect in this area for the coming decades.”

“This new 55-mile corridor will be an alternate to Interstate 10 and will help by reliving congestion on what is now just one major route between Phoenix and Tucson.”

With businesses and homes are continuing to develop, ADOT believes that this project would be beneficial in to the future.

“We know there’s a lot of houses that are already pretty close to this corridor, and there’s going to be a lot more coming in the future, as well as many businesses. So this is going to be a very important corridor. That’s why we’ve been taking a very close look at this for a number of years,” says Groff. “This is something that’s going to be built in many pieces over many years. it’s going to take further study to determine which part of the corridor to begin with and how that progresses over time.”

The North-South Corridor connector is one of three major projects where there is now a corridor identified but no money to build it. Other planned freeways are State Route 30, which would start at the Durango Curve and follow the Salt River to Avondale and Goodyear, as well as Interstate 11, which would cross the entire state from the Hoover Dam through Wickenburg and south to Nogales.

All of these projects right now are just lines on a map, but for any of them to get built, the state would have to find some funds. Federal likely will be part of the equation but also a transportation tax like the one voters approved to build the Loop 101 and 202 around the Valley.

If you would like more information about this North-South Corridor project, check out their website here, e-mail northsouth@azdot.gov, or call 1-855-712-8530.