Ground settling creating more work, closures on Loop 101

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by Gina Maravilla

Bio | Email | Follow: @GinaMaravillaTV

azfamily.com

Posted on June 2, 2011 at 11:05 AM

Updated Thursday, Jun 2 at 11:06 AM

PHOENIX -- The Loop 101 in the West Valley has been under construction for some time now as crews work to add a carpool lane. But in addition to creating more space on the freeway, the Arizona Department of Transportation says its crews also have to repair the Agua Fria, which has developed dips. Engineers say ground settlement due to voids, or spaces shifting in the ground beneath the freeway, caused sagging to develop over several years at the Camelback Road interchange.

So now construction workers will replace the pavement with reinforced concrete. That means several weekend freeway closures so crews can make the repairs.  
 
Starting Friday night (June 3), the weekend closures of the Loop 101 are scheduled as follows:
 
• Northbound Loop 101 closed at Camelback Road from 9 p.m. Friday (June 3) to 5 a.m. Monday (June 6) for pavement reconstruction. Drivers are encouraged to use alternate freeway routes. Northbound Loop 101 traffic will be directed to detour along 91st Avenue. 
 
• Southbound Loop 101 closed at Camelback Road from 9 p.m. Friday (June 10) to 5 a.m. Monday (June 13) for pavement reconstruction. Drivers are encouraged to use alternate freeway routes. Southbound Loop 101 traffic will be directed to detour along 91st Avenue. 
 
• Loop 101
closed in either direction at times at Camelback Road from 9 p.m. Friday (June 17) to 5 a.m. Monday (June 20) to complete pavement work. Drivers will be directed to use detour route as needed, including 91st Avenue.
 
Earlier this year, crews began work to stabilize the ground below the interchange in advance of building a stronger section of pavement. The improvements, estimated at $1 million, are part of a larger $90 million project to add High Occupancy Vehicle lanes along Loop 101 between I-10 and State Route 51.

According to ADOT, over the past few months crews injected a cement grouting material into approximately 400 holes. The cement was pumped into the voids in the soil as far as 30 feet below the surface. The mixture then hardened to stabilize the ground.   

Over the next two weekends, crews will remove the existing freeway pavement, one direction at a time, and then add a new concrete pavement reinforced with steel rebar to prevent any future settling. Work on the third weekend (June 17-20) will concentrate on adding a layer of smooth rubberized asphalt over the reinforced pavement, along with pavement markings.

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