Seat belts and door handles can cause severe burns in extreme heat

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Metal seat belts, plastic latches on car seats, even door handles can get so hot they'll burn an unsuspecting child's skin in a matter of seconds. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Metal seat belts, plastic latches on car seats, even door handles can get so hot they'll burn an unsuspecting child's skin in a matter of seconds. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Scottsdale mom Kelly Kienle knows it can be downright dangerous if her vehicle has been sitting out in the Arizona heat. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Scottsdale mom Kelly Kienle knows it can be downright dangerous if her vehicle has been sitting out in the Arizona heat. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
SCOTTSDALE, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -

Loading your kids in the car should be no big deal.

But Scottsdale mom Kelly Kienle knows it can be downright dangerous if her vehicle has been sitting out in the Arizona heat.

"It's like the surface of the sun," said Kienle. "My poor kids. It's got to be at least 145 to 150 degrees in the car."

[SPECIAL SECTION: Arizona's extreme heat]

Phoenix Fire Department Capt. Rob McDade said there are several potential hot spots inside your car when the weather climbs over 110 degrees.

Metal seat belt buckles, plastic latches on car seats, even door handles can get so hot they'll burn an unsuspecting child's skin in a matter of seconds.

[RELATED: Heat safety 101]

"You can actually get to 150 degrees exposed on to that vinyl seat, or metal seat belt," said McDade. "It can cause a first-degree burn, where it will burn through those dermal layers of the skin and leave a scar for their life."

A mom recently posted pictures on social media of her baby's second-degree burns caused by a car seat buckle.

[RELATED: The heat index]

And if you think the inside of a car can be dangerous, playgrounds can be worse.

Arizona's Family took the temperature of several items at a Valley park on Tuesday.

A swing set was 148 degrees.

Metal stairs were 172 degrees.

A climbing log was 202 degrees.

A kid's slide was 205 degrees.

[RELATED: Your car is baking in the heat; here's how to help]

Parents are being warned that when it gets this hot to keep kids off the playground and make sure to cool down their car before the kids get in.

"I literally have had to wait it out until the A/C cools things down before we can buckle them in," said Kienle. "It's scary."

McDade suggests running your car's air conditioner a few minutes before letting kids inside.

He also suggests parking your vehicle in the shade or using a sun visor.

Parents are also advised to cover car seats and seat belts with a towel or blanket so they are not in direct sunlight.

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Copyright 2018 KPHO/KTVK (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.


Jason Barry
Jason Barry has been reporting in the Valley since 1997.

Click to learn more about Jason.

Jason Barry

Jason Barry has been reporting in the Valley since 1997.

He is a nine-time Rocky Mountain Emmy Award winner who is best known for his weekly Dirty Dining reports, which highlight local restaurants with major health code violations.

Jason was born in Los Angeles and graduated from the University of Miami.

An avid sports fan, Jason follows the Diamondbacks, Cardinals and Suns with his wife, Karen, and son, Joshua.

His favorite stories to cover are the station’s Pay it Forward segments, which reward members of the community with $500 for going ‘above and beyond’ the call of duty to help others.

Jason, started his career at WBTW-TV in Florence, SC before moving to WALA-TV in Mobile, AL, was named the Associated Press Reporter of the Year in 2002.

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