Free and inexpensive ways to make your pool safer before the heat sets in

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(Source: 3TV/CBS 5) (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
"Some things you have to look at through a child's standpoint," said Deputy Chief Forrest Smith with Mesa Fire Dept. "Some of the things you could do here is install an extra bolt or deadbolt that's higher up, keeping that locked." (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) "Some things you have to look at through a child's standpoint," said Deputy Chief Forrest Smith with Mesa Fire Dept. "Some of the things you could do here is install an extra bolt or deadbolt that's higher up, keeping that locked." (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
(3TV/CBS 5) -

Another close call, this time at a Chandler pool. Thursday afternoon a 5-year-old little girl may have used a chair to climb over the fence and was found face down in the water. 

She's going to be OK, but seven other kids tragically have died from drowning already this year in the Valley. 

This weekend, temperatures are going to exceed 105. It'll be the perfect time to enjoy the pool. 

The Mesa Fire and Medical Department says there are some free and inexpensive things you can do now to make your oasis safer.

Deputy Chief Forrest Smith walked us through a home to assess what pool security works, and what needs improvement. 

"The Drowning Prevention Coalition of Arizona came up with this terminology, it's ABC's Adults, Barriers, Classes or Coastguard approved vest," said Deputy Chief Forrest Smith with the Mesa Fire and Medical Department. 

Looking at the home's barriers, Smith started in the kitchen, at the back door leading to the yard.

"Some things you have to look at through a child's standpoint," said Smith. "Some of the things you could do here is install an extra bolt or deadbolt that's higher up, keeping that locked."

Smith says one easy way to make the door more secure is by picking up an alarm from a hardware store. They cost between $10 to $15, are easy to install and can make a big difference in a pool's security. 

Out on the patio, Smith pointed out another possible risk. 

"Out here there's furniture, which is perfectly fine. But one thing you have to consider is can that furniture then be used as a way for a child to climb up and over a fence," asked Smith.  

The home's pool had a fence, but Smith found the locking mechanism on the self-closing gate was rusted and did not close properly. 

"Because a door without the locks or with anything that blocks it is no longer a barrier," said Smith. 

Smith advises homeowners to clean up all toys after using the pool so children aren't tempted to enter the water when swimming time is over and get rid of any bricks or rocks that can be used to prop a pool gate open. 

"Those are things that all go together, not one thing works on its own. So what we ask and want people to do is to have those all in place, because if one happens to break down you have a backup. And nothing replaces adult supervision," said Smith. 

Smith gave this home's pool security a final letter grade. 

"I'd put this closer to a C or a D. What has to happen here is the homeowner, which is great that they recognize there's (sic) some things that need to be fixed, just has to do the due diligence of going though and doing these walk-throughs," said Smith. "It's worth the time, it's worth the money and it just really allows that person the opportunity to protect not only their loved ones but also any neighbors, anybody who comes over." 

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Lauren ReimerLauren Reimer joined the 3TV/CBS 5 family in June 2016. She is originally from Racine, WI but is no stranger to our heat.

Click to learn more about Lauren.

Lauren Reimer

She previously worked for KVOA in Tucson, covering topics that matter to Arizonans including the monsoon, wildfires and border issues. During the child migrant crisis of 2014, Reimer was one of only a handful of journalists given access to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection detention facility in Nogales, where hundreds of unaccompanied children were being held after crossing into the U.S. from Central America. Before that, Reimer worked at WREX in Rockford, IL. Lauren is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee and still visits home often. When not chasing news stories, Reimer loves to explore, enjoying everything from trying new adventurous foods to visiting state and national parks or local places of historical significance.

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