March for our Lives students more determined than ever following Texas mass shooting

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Mesa high school students Jorden Harb and Isabella Boker. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5 News) Mesa high school students Jorden Harb and Isabella Boker. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5 News)
A 17-year-old carrying a shotgun and a revolver opened fire at a Houston-area high school Friday. (Source: CBS News) A 17-year-old carrying a shotgun and a revolver opened fire at a Houston-area high school Friday. (Source: CBS News)
Mesa high school student Jordan Harb. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5 News) Mesa high school student Jordan Harb. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5 News)
Mesa high school student Isabella Boker. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5 News) Mesa high school student Isabella Boker. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5 News)
MESA, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -

Mesa high school students Jordan Harb and Isabella Boker kept checking updates on their phones this morning, and the news kept getting worse.

At least 10 people killed in another mass shooting.

This time, at a high school in Texas.

[RELATED:10 killed in shooting at Texas high school; suspect Dimitrios Pagourtzis charged]

"It really was grief," said Harb. "I cried this morning, it's something that every kid in America can relate to because we all are scared in our classrooms and the kids who died today were just like me."

It was just a couple months ago, the Valley teens joined thousands of other students in a March for Our Lives protest at the state capitol.

[RELATED: March for Our Lives Arizona draws in 15,000 in front of state capitol]

They were there pushing lawmakers for common sense gun reform, and more funding for school resource officers following the deadly mass shooting in Parkland, Florida.

But despite their best efforts, Arizona's legislative session ended without passage of a school safety plan. 

"We live in a democracy where peoples voices matter, and right now it kind of feels like it doesn't," said Boker. "When people are asking for change, and the government is not giving it to them."

The student activists said what happened in Texas Friday has made them more determined to push for change and make our schools safer.

"I don't think the people in office are capable of having the empathy to make change," said Harb. "The Governor tweeted he is praying for the people of Sante Fe, but prayers have not stopped 24 school shooting since Parkland. We need policies not prayers."

Students with March for our Lives are planning a candlelight vigil Monday night at 7pm at the State Capitol to honor the victims of the Texas shooting.

They are also asking the Governor to call for a special session, so lawmakers can pass school safety reform.

Students have also set up a GoFundMe page to raise money for victims of the Texas shooting.

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Jason Barry
Jason Barry has been reporting in the Valley since 1997.

Click to learn more about Jason.

Jason Barry

Jason Barry has been reporting in the Valley since 1997.

He is a nine-time Rocky Mountain Emmy Award winner who is best known for his weekly Dirty Dining reports, which highlight local restaurants with major health code violations.

Jason was born in Los Angeles and graduated from the University of Miami.

An avid sports fan, Jason follows the Diamondbacks, Cardinals and Suns with his wife, Karen, and son, Joshua.

His favorite stories to cover are the station’s Pay it Forward segments, which reward members of the community with $500 for going ‘above and beyond’ the call of duty to help others.

Jason, started his career at WBTW-TV in Florence, SC before moving to WALA-TV in Mobile, AL, was named the Associated Press Reporter of the Year in 2002.

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