Dockless Bird scooters land in Tempe

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Right now, Bird scooters are only available in Tempe. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Right now, Bird scooters are only available in Tempe. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
The City of Scottsdale sent Bird a cease-and-desist order, saying that the scooters violate the City's ordinance about motorized skateboards. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) The City of Scottsdale sent Bird a cease-and-desist order, saying that the scooters violate the City's ordinance about motorized skateboards. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
The company says it won't bring any additional scooters to the area unless each one averages at least 3 rides per day. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) The company says it won't bring any additional scooters to the area unless each one averages at least 3 rides per day. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
TEMPE, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -

You can rent a car. You can rent a bike. So, why not rent a scooter?

A relatively new company, named Bird, just rolled out dockless electric scooters in Tempe, but not without some resistance.

“I saw this a few days ago and I was a little skeptical at first,” said first-time Bird user Vinny Viti. “I think it's really cool, honestly."

You’ve likely seen the green and yellow bikes around Phoenix. Bicycle sharing companies, like Ofo and LimeBike, have been in the market for several months. There are hundreds, if not thousands, of them and they can be parked anywhere-- which has made their presence controversial.

[RELATED: Bicycles from bike share programs annoy some in Phoenix]

“There are a lot, with the different companies that bring them out. It kind of is overwhelming for some,” said ASU student Lindsey Covell.

Not everyone is on board with having more freestanding vehicles around.

[RELATED: Scottsdale residents sound off on new bike share program at transportation meeting]

The City of Scottsdale sent Bird a cease-and-desist order, saying that the scooters violate the City's ordinance about motorized skateboards. But Bird promises to be a good neighbor.  

Come nighttime, you won't see a single scooter. Bird scooters are only available during the day. Bird personnel pick up the scooters at 8 p.m. for recharging and drop them off at popular locations at 7 a.m.

[RELATED: Not everyone's on board with Scottsdale's new bike share program]

Right now, Bird scooters are only available in Tempe. Bird won’t disclose the exact number of scooters it has placed around town, but the app shows around 200 available scooters in the area. 

The company says it won't bring any additional scooters to the area unless each one averages at least three rides per day. It also promises to give $1 per scooter per day to the cities it operates in to help pay for more bike lanes and fund safe-riding programs.

[RELATED: Scottsdale 'reluctantly' participating in talks to regulate rental bikes]

"I definitely think that adds a lot of variety to the already large amount of options that you have,” Covell said. 

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Lauren ReimerLauren Reimer joined the 3TV/CBS 5 family in June 2016. She is originally from Racine, WI but is no stranger to our heat.

Click to learn more about Lauren.

Lauren Reimer

She previously worked for KVOA in Tucson, covering topics that matter to Arizonans including the monsoon, wildfires and border issues. During the child migrant crisis of 2014, Reimer was one of only a handful of journalists given access to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection detention facility in Nogales, where hundreds of unaccompanied children were being held after crossing into the U.S. from Central America. Before that, Reimer worked at WREX in Rockford, IL. Lauren is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee and still visits home often. When not chasing news stories, Reimer loves to explore, enjoying everything from trying new adventurous foods to visiting state and national parks or local places of historical significance.

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