APS demonstrates how Mylar balloons can catch fire on power lines

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APS demonstrated what happens when a Mylar balloon touches an overhead power line. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) APS demonstrated what happens when a Mylar balloon touches an overhead power line. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
APS demonstrated what happens when a Mylar balloon touches an overhead power line. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) APS demonstrated what happens when a Mylar balloon touches an overhead power line. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
APS demonstrated what happens when a Mylar balloon touches an overhead power line. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) APS demonstrated what happens when a Mylar balloon touches an overhead power line. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

A Mylar balloon caught fire when it came into contact with an overhead power line in a demonstration held by APS Thursday.

The demonstration was performed by a trained lineman using APS's mobile energized model of their electrical equipment.

APS hopes the demonstration will warn people not to let go of Mylar balloons because of the fire hazard they pose when near power lines.

APS said throughout 2016, balloons caused 81 outages, interrupting service to nearly 50,000 APS customers.

[RELATED: Surviving a summer power outage]

That is nearly double the number of outages APS customers experienced from balloons in 2015, APS said. 

APS is giving the warning just in time for graduation season, when balloons are more common.

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