2nd woman sues Peoria Red Lobster over lettuce possibly contaminated with E. coli

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A Washington state woman said she got sick from eating tainted lettuce in a Caesar salad at a Peoria Red Lobster. (Source: robynmac / 123RF Stock Photo) A Washington state woman said she got sick from eating tainted lettuce in a Caesar salad at a Peoria Red Lobster. (Source: robynmac / 123RF Stock Photo)
The outbreak of E. coli linked to romaine lettuce grown in Yuma has spread to 29 states, including Arizona. (Source: CNN) The outbreak of E. coli linked to romaine lettuce grown in Yuma has spread to 29 states, including Arizona. (Source: CNN)
PEORIA, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -

A second woman is claiming a Peoria Red Lobster is responsible for making her sick with E. coli.

In a lawsuit filed on Monday, Penny Bunch said she ate a Caesar salad that had romaine lettuce and was contaminated with E. coli at the restaurant near 83rd Avenue and Bell Road.

[READ MORE: Mesa girl fighting for life after eating salad possibly contaminated with E. coli]

She is from Washington state but visited the Red Lobster on March 21.

Bunch started to feel ill around March 24. She went to the hospital on March 26 and stayed there until March 30.

[RELATED: Lettuce E. coli outbreak the largest in a decade]

She is claiming Red Lobster was negligent in serving her the romaine lettuce and is liable for her injuries.

Bunch hasn't said how much money she is seeking.

[RELATED: Here's everything you need to know about E. coli]

“The health and safety of our guests is [sic] important to us, which is why we take food safety very seriously. Since this is an open legal matter, I can’t share any additional information at this time," a Red Lobster spokeswoman said in a statement.

The outbreak of E. coli linked to romaine lettuce grown in Yuma has spread to 29 states, including Arizona, where there have been at least eight cases.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said there have been 149 cases since the outbreak began in March.

[RELATED: Lettuce E. coli outbreak the largest in a decade]

One person, from California, has died.

"We have lots of e coli in our intestines, and we're in this great relationship with them where the right amount doesn't affect you," said Dr. Frank LoVecchio with Banner Poison and Drug Information Center.  "Anything that knocks that curve off, too much of one bacteria, too little of another, will cause you to have a severe infection."

Dr. LoVecchio said most infections are treated with plenty of fluids and perhaps some anti-nausea medication.

"The type of E. coli that's been found in this lettuce is the most toxic one to humans, and what I mean by most toxic, it causes nausea, vomiting and diarrhea," Dr. LoVecchio said. If you are concerned you may be impacted, you can call the Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222.

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