A 3-week-old foal the only survivor of wild horse die-off

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A baby foal was the only horse that survived after its herd died in a mud pit. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) A baby foal was the only horse that survived after its herd died in a mud pit. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
She was transferred from the Navajo Nation to the Coconino Humane Association and placed in the care of doctors at the Aspen Veterinary Clinic in Flagstaff. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) She was transferred from the Navajo Nation to the Coconino Humane Association and placed in the care of doctors at the Aspen Veterinary Clinic in Flagstaff. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
"She follows us and nickers and canters around. She's like a big dog right now," said Dr. Allison Forbes. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) "She follows us and nickers and canters around. She's like a big dog right now," said Dr. Allison Forbes. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Her big eyes and even bigger appetite have won the hearts of her caretakers. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Her big eyes and even bigger appetite have won the hearts of her caretakers. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
FLAGSTAFF, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -

Last week, an entire herd of horses was found dead on Navajo Nation land in northern Arizona.

It's believed the animals were searching for water in a mud pit when they got stuck and couldn't get out. 

Nearly 200 animals died. 

[GRAPHIC PHOTO: 191 dead horses found at Gray Mountain watering hole]

[GRAPHIC PHOTO: Horses trapped by mud of dried-up watering hole]

But there was one survivor, a tiny foal now named Grace. 

Grace almost didn't make it either. 

"She was in critical condition. Her mouth was completely dry. Her gums were completely white. She could not lift her own head," said Michelle Ryan, executive director of the Coconino Humane Association

She was transferred from the Navajo Nation to the Coconino Humane Association and placed in the care of doctors at the Aspen Veterinary Clinic in Flagstaff. 

Amazingly, the little foal pulled through and is now on the path to recovery.

"She follows us and nickers and canters around. She's like a big dog right now," said Dr. Allison Forbes with Aspen Veterinary Clinic. 

Her big eyes and even bigger appetite have won the hearts of her caretakers.

"I think that her story of being the little lone survivor at such a young age is very heartwarming and heart-wrenching at the same time because you could just imagine what she was going through but she's just this little fighter and we love her here," Forbes said. 

Grace will never be able to go back to the wild. When she's ready, she'll be adopted out. 

In the meantime, Ryan says her care will be costly. She says any donations to the Coconino Humane Association would greatly help ensure she gets the best treatment possible.

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Lauren ReimerLauren Reimer joined the 3TV/CBS 5 family in June 2016. She is originally from Racine, WI but is no stranger to our heat.

Click to learn more about Lauren.

Lauren Reimer

She previously worked for KVOA in Tucson, covering topics that matter to Arizonans including the monsoon, wildfires and border issues. During the child migrant crisis of 2014, Reimer was one of only a handful of journalists given access to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection detention facility in Nogales, where hundreds of unaccompanied children were being held after crossing into the U.S. from Central America. Before that, Reimer worked at WREX in Rockford, IL. Lauren is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee and still visits home often. When not chasing news stories, Reimer loves to explore, enjoying everything from trying new adventurous foods to visiting state and national parks or local places of historical significance.

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