Chandler mom works to prevent hot car deaths after suffering tragedy

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Elizabeth Brown is doing all she can to prevent children from being left in hot cars. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Elizabeth Brown is doing all she can to prevent children from being left in hot cars. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Brown’s 3-month-old baby girl, Amberlee, died after being pulled from a hot car in June 2007. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Brown’s 3-month-old baby girl, Amberlee, died after being pulled from a hot car in June 2007. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Brown says no parent is “immune” from this tragedy. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Brown says no parent is “immune” from this tragedy. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
She works with the organization Kids And Cars to raise awareness and offer tips and guidance to parents and guardians. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) She works with the organization Kids And Cars to raise awareness and offer tips and guidance to parents and guardians. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
CHANDLER, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -

This time of year is very difficult for a Chandler mom who lost her baby to Arizona’s deadly heat.

For years, Elizabeth Brown has coped with tragedy by helping families across the country prevent another hot car death.

Brown’s 3-month-old baby girl, Amberlee, died after being pulled from a hot car in June 2007. Brown says her husband had taken the baby along to drop off a family member. After returning home, the couple later realized Amberlee was still strapped in her car seat.

[RELATED: 'Don't Leave Me Behind!' campaign warns of hot car dangers]

“She had the biggest brown eyes and she had the best personality,” says Brown. “We're great parents and it happened to us.”

Brown says no parent is “immune” from this tragedy. That’s why she works with the organization Kids And Cars to raise awareness and offer tips and guidance to parents and guardians.

“I would hope that people would choose to put their babies in the line of sight,” says Brown, who points to research showing an increase in hot car deaths as parents began placing kids in the back seat to prevent deadly impacts with airbags. Brown encourages families not to place the car seat directly behind the driver’s seat.

Brown has also pushed for sensors in cars that can tell a driver a little one is in the back. 

“We protect our batteries. We protect the lights in our cars. We protect so many things but we're not protecting the most precious thing which is a baby in the back seat,” says Brown.

Brown along with Kids and Cars has made significant progress in this area. General Motors is the first to use the alert technology.

Brown says sharing her story can be emotional, but she does it to save lives.

“It's not as painful for me to do those things as it is to watch another family go through this,” says Brown.

Kids and Cars offers tips for parents to prevent hot car deaths. Brown suggests using items for “triggers” like putting something essential next to the baby’s car seat, like a shoe or purse, which would force a parent or guardian to go back into the back seat before walking away from a parked car.

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