Woman suing Red Lobster in Peoria after eating salad possibly contaminated with E. coli

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Information collected thus far indicates that chopped romaine lettuce from Yuma could be the cause of the outbreak and is making people sick. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Information collected thus far indicates that chopped romaine lettuce from Yuma could be the cause of the outbreak and is making people sick. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Escherichia coli (abbreviated as E. coli) are bacteria found in the environment, foods, and intestines of people and animals. E. coli are a large and diverse group of bacteria. (Source: CDC) Escherichia coli (abbreviated as E. coli) are bacteria found in the environment, foods, and intestines of people and animals. E. coli are a large and diverse group of bacteria. (Source: CDC)
PEORIA, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -

A Glendale woman is suing a Red Lobster in Peoria after she claimed the lettuce in her Caeser salad made her sick with E. coli.

The 2018 E. coli outbreak has infected over 100 people from a reported 25 states, including 8 reported cases in Arizona.

[RELATED: Here's everything you need to know about E. coli]

Information collected thus far indicates that chopped romaine lettuce from Yuma could be the cause of the outbreak and is making people sick.

According to court paperwork, Rosalie Styles ate at a Red Lobster near 83rd Avenue and Bell Road back in March.

[READ MORE: Mesa girl fighting for life after eating salad possibly contaminated with E. coli]

Styles claims she consumed romaine lettuce from the Yuma growing region in her Caesar salad at the Red Lobster. The lettuce was allegedly contaminated by E. coli, leading to Styles infection and related injuries, court paperwork said.

Just under a week after eating the salad, Styles began feeling ill. She experienced nausea, abdominal cramps, fatigue and bloody diarrhea.

[RELATED: Lettuce E. coli outbreak the largest in a decade]

Style ultimately admitted herself to a hospital on March 30 and remained hospitalized until April 2.

During her hospitalization, Styles tested positive for E. coli, court paperwork said. She continues to recover from the infection.

According to the lawsuit, Styles claims Red Lobster breached their warranty “with respect to the food product sold to her, including the implied warranties of merchantability and of fitness for a particular use.”

[MORE: Multistate E. coli outbreak traced to lettuce from Arizona]

She also claims Red Lobster is liable and showed negligence for the selling of lettuce contaminated with E. coli.

Styles is seeking an unknown amount of damages, reimbursement for attorneys’ fees incurred and further relief as deemed necessary and proper.

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