As Seen on GMAZ: Wednesday, May 2

Posted: Updated:

The Wildlife World Zoo: Mountain Lion

Mountain lion Facts:

  • Unlike the typical buff colored adults, baby mountain lions are camouflaged with dark spots that fade during their first year. 
  • Female mountain lions weigh an average of 100 pounds.  Male mountain lions grow significantly larger, weighing up to 180 pounds. 
  • Unlike the African lion, the mountain lion is a solitary creature, excluding breeding season males do not play an active role in rearing the young.
  • Mountain lions are some of the most adaptable animals in the Western Hemisphere. They are able to adapt to almost any type of habitat from desert scrub, to swamps and grasslands, to mountain forest. 
  • Historically, mountain lions could be found anywhere from the east coast to the west coast and as north as Alaska and south as the southern tip of South America. However, due to the rapid growth of modernization during the past century, there has been significant habit loss and a decline in prey. This has caused the mountain lion population to dramatically decrease. Other than a small mountain lion population found in Florida, this large predator was nearly eliminated from the eastern United States.
  • Due to the mountain lion’s diversity, local names for the mountain lion vary depending on the region they are in. In the English language, the Mountain Lion is known by over 40 different names, such as the puma, cougar, and panther.
  • Given the declining population and elusive nature of these large predators, visiting the mountain lion cubs at Wildlife World is a great way for guests and school children to learn the importance of maintaining a healthy ecosystem and to learn about the wildlife that can be found in our own backyards!

The Wildlife World Zoo is located at 16501 W. Northern Ave. in Litchfield Park.
For more information on all the zoo's exciting attractions and events, call 623-935-WILD or check out their website: www.wildlifeworld.com

Local Love: Roland's  

Nadia Holguin and Armando Hernandez of Tacos Chiwas teamed up with Chris Bianco of Pizzeria Bianco to launch Roland's Cafe Market Bar, a new restaurant at Van Buren and 15th The result of the James Beard Award Winning chef collaborating with his friends, is all kinds of deliciousness at the all-day restaurant.

The trio have determined that the restaurant will serve a hybrid menu which is an expression of Arizona cuisine that overlaps cultures communities and generations. Breakfast kicks off at 7 am with the likes of a machaca burrito before transitioning to the lunch menu at 11 am which features everything from items such as a citrus salad, burritos, quesadillas or a rice bowl with wood roasted veggies. In addition to being open for dinner, Roland's will have a late-night menu that Taco Chiwas friendlies will recognize.

For more information: www.Rolandsphx.com 

Roland's Café Market Bar 
1509 E. Van Buren St., Phoenix, Arizona 85006
Phone: 602-441-4749
Email: info@rolandsphx.com

Hours:
Mon-Thurs: 7am-12am
Fri-Sat: 7am-2am
Sun: 7am-9pm

Farmer's Market Challenge 

Every week in May, we'll give a Valley chef $30 and see what they're able to create using only items from a farmer’s market (meats, vegetables, sauces, pasta, etc.) plus a few kitchen staples. It will be a fun way for viewers to see how a Valley chef is able to whip up a delicious meal using only ingredients from a farmer's market, promoting farm to table cooking and creative thinking!

Market by Jennifer's Restaurant and Bar
3603 E Indian School Rd, Ste A, Phoenix, AZ 85018
Phone: (602) 626-5050
Website: https://www.themarketbyjennifers.com/

Uptown Farmer's Market
757 N Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85013
Phone: (602) 859-5648
Website: https://uptownmarketaz.com/

Wandering Stress: The Herbal Pharmacist says there are three herbs that increase focus, relieve stress and improve sleep.

A now famous Harvard study finds our minds negatively wander about 50 percent of the time, and the stress that results from this type of mind wandering can lead to digestive disorders, short-term memory loss, premature coronary heart disease, heart attacks and despair.  At the same time, antidepressant usage has skyrocketed, and doctors are now prescribing antidepressants for non-depression diagnosis such as anxiety, sleep and increased mental focus.

David Foreman, known to audiences as The Herbal Pharmacist says this is troubling since antidepressants also carry the FDA's most stringent "black box" warning for life-threatening adverse effects.  Foreman says the risks associated with antidepressants for many of these health complaints outweigh the benefits, and there may be more effective ways to tackle stress, mood, focus and sleep from nature's pharmacy before pulling out the prescription pad. He will share with your audience the science behind three specific herbs from around the globe that can help increase focus, relieve stress and improve sleep (talking points and visuals include calming herbs from: South African succulent, arctic root and tropical flower).

Foreman says the risks associated with antidepressants for many of these health complaints outweigh the benefits, and there may be more effective ways to tackle stress, mood, focus and sleep from nature's pharmacy before pulling out the prescription pad. He will share with your audience the science behind three specific herbs from around the globe that can help increase focus, relieve stress and improve sleep: 

1.    South African Succulent: Can you imagine the stress and focus required to hunt and gather your entire tribe's dinner in certain territories of South Africa? As early as 1738, this particular herb derived from a medicinal, chewable plant was commonly used by the San people to relieve pain, stave off hunger and enhance mood during long hunting trips. More recently a specific developed extract from this medicinal plant called Zembrin has attracted wider scientific attention for its ability to improve cognitive function while reducing emotional distress, relieving tension and improving calmness and overall mood. Zembrin is backed by five rigorous randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials and is the first ingredient from this plant to have completed clinical trials. Purchasing supplements with the Zembrin ingredient will also circle back to benefit the indigenous tribes that discovered it through the South African San Council. 

2.    Arctic Root: Used for centuries to cope with the stressful life of cold
Siberian climate and increase physical endurance and resistance to high-altitude sickness, the root of rhodiola rosa is frequently used today to increase energy, stamina, strength and mental capacity to help the body adapt to and resist physical, chemical and environmental stress. While rhodiola may not give you the immediate "chill out" effect, it works behind-the-scenes to help your body adapt to stress and negate the negative effects of the stress hormone, cortisol. 

3.    Tropical Flower: If your idea of "chilling out" involves a cocktail on a tropical island than you can begin to understand the medicinal properties of passion flower. There are more than 400 species of tropical passion flowers, but most originate throughout Central and South America and the Polynesian Islands. Native Americans used passion flower for insomnia, hysteria and epilepsy, but today it is more commonly used for anxiety or insomnia. Taking a dose of passion flower is a lot like drinking a couple of cocktails, so be extra cautions if mixing it with alcohol consumption. 

To learn more about David Foreman visit: www.herbalpharmacist.com