Cave Creek man registers 'Red for Ed' to try and block movement

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Jasper Nichols is trying to get companies to stop printing Red for Ed t-shirts. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Jasper Nichols is trying to get companies to stop printing Red for Ed t-shirts. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
On April 20, Nichols decided to register the trade names of "Arizona Educators United" and "#RedforEd" with the Arizona Secretary of State. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) On April 20, Nichols decided to register the trade names of "Arizona Educators United" and "#RedforEd" with the Arizona Secretary of State. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
He went to several local t-shirt printing companies like Acme Prints and told them to stop printing too, which they did at first until they decided it was worth it to them to continue serving the teachers. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) He went to several local t-shirt printing companies like Acme Prints and told them to stop printing too, which they did at first until they decided it was worth it to them to continue serving the teachers. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Nichols said his reasoning isn't about the teacher's pay, but about what he believes the Red for Ed movement and AEA is about. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Nichols said his reasoning isn't about the teacher's pay, but about what he believes the Red for Ed movement and AEA is about. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
CAVE CREEK, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -

Acme Prints in Phoenix has been busy making Red for Ed t-shirts because teachers keep walking through the door to buy them, thousands of them.

“We've printed just shy of  24,000 shirts now,” said owner Dan Hargest.

Hargest was caught off guard when he got a Facebook message from a man named Jasper Nichols.

[SPECIAL SECTION: Arizona schools in crisis]

"Cease. Got his attention, didn't it?” said Nichols.

 "If I had to put it into one word, I would say it's just absurd,” said Hargest.

Here's the backstory. On April 20, Nichols decided to register the trade names of "Arizona Educators United" and "#RedforEd" with the Arizona Secretary of State.

That means, those names are now registered to him, and he wants the Red for Ed organizers to stop using them.

[RELATED: Striking teachers commit to return to school Thursday if state budget is passed]

"They are not answering anything I send them,” said Nichols.

“So you blocked them by getting these names registered to you?” asked Briana Whitney.

“Yes,” said Nichols.

He went to several local t-shirt printing companies like Acme Prints and told them to stop printing too, which they did at first until they decided it was worth it to them to continue serving the teachers.

[RELATED: Gov. Doug Ducey releases open letter about education budget]

"I call him a conspiracy theorist, although he doesn't like that title,” said Hargest. “I don’t think he has a legal leg to stand on.”

But Nichols said his reasoning isn't about the teachers' pay, but about what he believes the Red for Ed movement and AEA is about.

“I think that's all this campaign is, is to change the elections, the primaries, the elections in November,” said Nichols.

[RELATED: Arizona school districts release plans for teacher walkout]

He’s now telling Red for Ed to figure something else out.

“They can go get a new name, as far as I'm concerned that's fine,’ said Nichols.

He said if Red for Ed organizers don’t stop using the two names, he will pursue a court order, but legal experts said that likely wouldn’t hold up in court.

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Briana WhitneyBriana Whitney joined CBS 5/3TV in February 2018, and is no stranger to the sunshine and heat!

Click to learn more about Briana.

Briana Whitney

She’s from Northern California, but prior to coming to Phoenix, she reported at KIII-TV in Corpus Christi, TX for three years.

During her time in South Texas, she reported on several national stories. Some of the most memorable were the 2015 Wimberley floods, reporting for eight hours off the Gulf of Mexico during Hurricane Harvey in August of 2017, and reporting from the church shooting in Sutherland Springs in November of 2017.

Her general assignment reporting won her two Associated Press awards, six EMMA awards, and one Emmy nomination for a half-hour special she wrote, produced and hosted on the issue of child pornography.

Briana graduated with a degree in broadcast journalism from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, and during college had seven different internships at several news stations.

When she isn’t chasing breaking news or working on a feature story, Briana loves checking out the best restaurants in the Valley, and hiking or rollerblading around town. Briana is very happy to have made Arizona home!

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