March For Our Lives Phoenix holds second rally at state capitol

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(Source: March For Our Lives Phoenix via Twitter) (Source: March For Our Lives Phoenix via Twitter)
March For Our Lives Phoenix sets up a visual of 73 t-shirts to represent children killed by gun violence since the Parkland shooting. The group cites GunViolenceArchive.org for that number. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) March For Our Lives Phoenix sets up a visual of 73 t-shirts to represent children killed by gun violence since the Parkland shooting. The group cites GunViolenceArchive.org for that number. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

Arizona group, March For Our Lives Phoenix, held a rally Thursday morning at the state capitol to honor the 70 children killed by firearms since the February 14 massacre in Parkland, Florida. 

The group cites GunViolenceArchive.org for the reported number of child deaths due to firearms. 

"We're honoring kids killed by gun violence with a special display on the Capitol lawn to remind legislators and Gov. Ducey that keeping children from dying at the hand of a gun takes action, not hollow words," said Jordan Harb, co-chair of March for Our Lives Phoenix.

This is the second rally held by the group, whose first rally was held on March 24, the same day as the national March For Our Lives events.

[RELATED: March for Our Lives Arizona draws in 15,000 in front of state capitol]

The morning of action comes after Ducey revealed his new school safety plan, 'Safe Arizona Schools', which the group says is not good enough.

"Gov. Doug Ducey's so called school safety plan is 51 pages of utter BS. The plan sucks. Governor, stop throwing pennies and empty promises at a problem that needs real funding and real action. Arizona needs a bump stock ban; 250 – 1 ratio for school counselors; fewer and not more guns on campus and universal background checks on gun purchasers. Ending gun violence takes courage, not politics that panders to the NRA," Harb said.

[READ MORE: Students to AZ Gov. Ducey: School safety plan does not do enough]

Ducey's plan will include more spending on school resource officers and behavioral health services in schools, as well as a new way to remove guns from unstable people including a centralized tip line and technology fixes to get state convictions and other red flags into the federal gun background check system faster.

[RELATED: Gov. Ducey speaks about his 'Safe Arizona Schools' plan while teachers plan walk-outs]

"I want to do everything possible," Ducey said while on Good Morning Arizona on 3TV in March.

Ducey's proposal wasn't enough for groups who have been protesting school shootings. The governor skirted the issues of background checks on private or gun show sales or banning bumpstock devices that allow rifles to fire like machine guns. These issues are thought to help stop more mass shootings from happening.

[READ MORE: Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey rolls out school safety package]

When asked about background checks at gunshows Ducey stepped around the question, only saying that federally licensed arms dealers will still be required to run a background check on a buyer. 

Ducey's plan will also feature a STOP order law which is an acronym for Severe Threat Order of Protection that will be able to stop potential mass shooters from having access to guns.

Ducey said he thinks his Safe Schools Arizona plan will be "the most thorough and thoughtful legislation in the nation."

Thursday's demonstration was held ahead of the planned weekend town halls across the country

On Saturday, March for Our Lives Phoenix is taking its message to elected officials at the community-based "Town Halls for Our Lives."

The group will host two town halls on Saturday, April 7, one each in the East and West Valley, to deliver its message to elected officials and their Arizona constituents.

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