Tempe hacking experts offer advice to keep you cyber safe

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These hackers I met with are students at the University of Advancing Technology in Tempe. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) These hackers I met with are students at the University of Advancing Technology in Tempe. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
They tell me it's very easy for someone like themselves to hack you or just about any system out there. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) They tell me it's very easy for someone like themselves to hack you or just about any system out there. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
They showed me what it looks like when malware infects your computer and deletes everything in it. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) They showed me what it looks like when malware infects your computer and deletes everything in it. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
PHOENIX (CBS 5) -

To keep you safer in the digital age, I sat down with some of the best hackers in the country right here in the Valley and picked their brains about how we can better protect ourselves against someone who might want to steal our information.

These hackers I met with are students at the University of Advancing Technology in Tempe.

[SPECIAL SECTION: CBS 5 This Morning]

They tell me it's very easy for someone like themselves to hack you or just about any system out there.

These guys though are bound by strict ethical guidelines, so that's not in their plans.

They showed me what it looks like when malware infects your computer and deletes everything in it.

This is why you absolutely cannot click on a link from someone you don't know!

"There are websites out there that let you have a random email and send it with a random email, so no one knows who you are," said a student that did not want to be identified.

"And the second they click on it?" CBS 5 This Morning Anchor Preston Phillips asked.

The student replied, "The second they click on it, they're done,"

When it comes to hacking, they won't share specifics on how to get into a system, but they did show me what it looks like, once you're in.

Basically, it's all text and command prompts.

If you know how to speak the language, you can potentially grab some very important data.

They did tell me that one simple step that can keep your information secure in the event of a breach or a destructive virus.

It has to do with how you log into your computer every day.

"Don't run your computer under the admin account, always have a secondary account. You don't need to be running under an admin account. If you run under a secondary account and something like this does happen, it's not going to be able to delete your whole system, it's only going to delete stuff from that user profile," said a student, who did not want to share his name.

They also tell us, that when you're out and about, where there's an unsecured public wi-fi, it's fine to join it, but never log onto social media or your bank account.

Hackers could be in the store and ready to pounce.

Also, be very wary of people shoulder surfing.

This is someone who could be looking over your back to see what you're typing.

They tell me you'd be surprised at how many people are hacked like this.

At the end of the day, these guys tell me, you should not be paranoid about getting hacked, just be aware of your surroundings, what you're posting online and where you're surfing the web.

Consider installing the latest anti-virus software and a firewall for added protections and refrain from posting any of your personal information on social media or online, especially if it's not an on unsecured network.

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