If MLB allowed pitchers to wear masks would they use them?

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MLB pitchers face line drives coming back at them at over 100 mph. (Source: The Associated Press) MLB pitchers face line drives coming back at them at over 100 mph. (Source: The Associated Press)
Arizona Diamondbacks starting pitcher Robbie Ray falls to the ground after being hit on the head by a ball back to the mound (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson) Arizona Diamondbacks starting pitcher Robbie Ray falls to the ground after being hit on the head by a ball back to the mound (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

A line-drive hit straight back at the pitcher is one of the scariest moments in baseball.

A baseball hit up the middle can blast back at the pitcher at over 100 miles an hour.

Arizona Diamondbacks pitcher Archie Bradley took one in the face in an April 2015 game with the Colorado Rockies. 

Outfield slugger Carlos Gonzalez drove a pitch into the face of Bradley and he went down on the ground for several minutes. Eventually, Bradley was able to walk off the field.

[RELATED: D-Backs Archie Bradley hit in face by line drive]

Fellow Diamondback Robbie Ray was hit by a line drive off the bat of St. Louis' Luke Voit on July night in 2017. Lying on the ground for several minutes, Ray was eventually carted off the field. Scary moments, but it comes with the position on the mound.

[RELATED: Arizona Diamondbacks pitcher Ray is doing well after being hit in head]

"We're the closest person, besides the catcher, to the hitter, so we're putting ourselves on the line every time we go out there. And obviously, the way the game is these days, guys are hitting the ball harder, pitchers are throwing harder, so you understand it's going to happen, and you accept it," said Robbie Ray.

"I think there are things that can be done. Individual players can wear certain pads and things like that. But, at the end of the day, it is kind of something you sign up for and its part of it," said Bradley.

The most important position on the field begs the question: if the MLB. association allowed pitchers to use masks, would they use them?

"No, I wouldn't. I wear a small insert that goes into my hat. I recommend it for everybody, even if you haven't been hit,' said Ray.

"Give me a football helmet; that's the only thing that would make me feel safe out there. So if you want to give me a football helmet with a dark visor, let's roll with it," said Bradley.

To each his own. At 60-feet, 6-inches distance, with the impact force of over a 100 miles an hour coming back at you, the decision to wear a mask or not rests with the pitchers. If masks become an option, we may see them become regular fixtures in the game.

"I know Major League Baseball does look at these things and investigates them. And if they're looking for a way to enhance the game and add to the safety of it, we will fully support it," said Diamondbacks manager Torey Lovullo.

[SPECIAL SECTION: Arizona Diamondbacks]

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