In-state tuition for DACA students case to be heard Monday

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The DACA students will start their news conference at 8:30 Monday morning outside the Arizona Supreme Court. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) The DACA students will start their news conference at 8:30 Monday morning outside the Arizona Supreme Court. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
In-state tuition for DACA students was granted by the Maricopa County Community College District but is now held up in court because of Attorney General Mark Brnovich. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) In-state tuition for DACA students was granted by the Maricopa County Community College District but is now held up in court because of Attorney General Mark Brnovich. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

It’s a question they don’t want to have to ask. “If this goes away…what are they going to do?”

Edder Diaz Martinez was brought to the United States from Mexico at 5 years old and is now a senior at ASU and one of roughly 300 DACA students at the university. He said right now he pays $7,000 per semester, but if in-state tuition is taken away from so-called Dreamers, that would drastically change.

[RELATED: Trump on deal for 'Dreamer' immigrants: 'NO MORE']

“I would pay about $14,000 per semester. So it’s almost double,” said Diaz Martinez. “Paying almost $30,000 a year, then $60,000, there’s no way I could afford that.”

[READ MORE: Arizona high court to consider in-state tuition for DREAMers]

In-state tuition for DACA students was granted by the Maricopa County Community College District but is now held up in court because of Attorney General Mark Brnovich. Brnovich said "Dreamers" are not eligible for lower tuition because of a 2006 proposition that does not allow DACA recipients to receive public benefits.

[READ MORE: Arizona court overturns in-state tuition for some immigrants]

Diaz Martinez said that's a double standard when it comes to public schools because DACA students pay taxes and contribute to the public universities.

“You’re talking about people who want to be doctors, they want to go into professions, STEM professions to contribute,” said Diaz Martinez.

[RELATED: AZ Board of Regents votes to give in-state tuition to DACA students]

He said the most detrimental part is how many DACA students would be forced to drop out of school due to financial constraints if their tuition doubles, which is a concern that's weighing on them emotionally too.

“At the end of the day, we do want to have normal lives. We want to feel like we are a normal person and a normal college student,” said Diaz Martinez.

[RELATED: Immigration advocacy group sends DACA recipients to DC to appeal to lawmakers]

The DACA students will start their news conference at 8:30 Monday morning outside the Arizona Supreme Court, and even though oral arguments begin Monday, that decision likely won't be made for a couple months.

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Briana WhitneyBriana Whitney joined CBS 5/3TV in February 2018, and is no stranger to the sunshine and heat!

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Briana Whitney

She’s from Northern California, but prior to coming to Phoenix, she reported at KIII-TV in Corpus Christi, TX for three years.

During her time in South Texas, she reported on several national stories. Some of the most memorable were the 2015 Wimberley floods, reporting for eight hours off the Gulf of Mexico during Hurricane Harvey in August of 2017, and reporting from the church shooting in Sutherland Springs in November of 2017.

Her general assignment reporting won her two Associated Press awards, six EMMA awards, and one Emmy nomination for a half-hour special she wrote, produced and hosted on the issue of child pornography.

Briana graduated with a degree in broadcast journalism from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, and during college had seven different internships at several news stations.

When she isn’t chasing breaking news or working on a feature story, Briana loves checking out the best restaurants in the Valley, and hiking or rollerblading around town. Briana is very happy to have made Arizona home!

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