Arizona teachers to lay out salary demands at state capitol

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Thousands of teachers are expected to protest at the state capitol, where organizers plan to lay out their demands directly to lawmakers. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Thousands of teachers are expected to protest at the state capitol, where organizers plan to lay out their demands directly to lawmakers. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Lisa Kling said she works two other jobs besides being a teacher. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Lisa Kling said she works two other jobs besides being a teacher. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Kling said she would need at least a 15 percent raise to consider leaving her job at Starbucks. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Kling said she would need at least a 15 percent raise to consider leaving her job at Starbucks. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

Arizona teachers are planning after-school rallies across the state Wednesday to demand action on higher wages.

Thousands of teachers are expected to protest at the state capitol, where organizers plan to lay out their demands directly to lawmakers.

[RELATED: Arizona teachers organizing to fight for better pay]

One teacher who will not attend is Lisa Kling. The pre-K educator with a master’s degree has a conflict: she’s scheduled to work at one of her two other jobs.

In addition to teaching in the Head Start program for low-income families five days a week at Sunnyslope Elementary in Phoenix, Kling said she works four to five nights at Starbucks and two days as a fitness instructor.

[RELATED: Arizona teachers protest low pay at state Capitol]

“My rent is almost one entire [school] paycheck,” Kling said. “Then you add the car and other necessities we need, it's hard to survive.”

Kling said she would need at least a 15 percent raise to consider leaving her job at Starbucks.

[RELATED: Arizona teachers organizing to fight for better pay]

Protest organizers may be eying a raise in that range. Noah Karvelis of Arizona Educators United said it would take an 11 percent raise to get Arizona elementary school teachers from dead-last in pay to second-to-last. But he argued that an 11 percent jump would not improve Arizona’s teacher shortage.

[RELATED: After Gov. Ducey signs tax extension, teachers say it's not enough]

“They're not moving to the second-to-last state. They're moving to Colorado or New Mexico where they can make $5,000, $10,000, maybe $15,000 more. And California is a whole nother story,” he said.

[MORE: Hundreds protest low teacher pay at Phoenix radio station]

He said #RedforEd activists have been in touch with teachers from West Virginia, who negotiated a 5 percent pay raise after a nine-day strike. However, he said organizers would wait to see the response by the governor and state lawmakers before serious talks of a strike began.

“I can't tell you what I think the odds are because anybody's guess is as good as mine right now,” he said when asked of the odds of a teacher strike. “It really depends on how our legislature and our governor responds, but the support is there for it in my opinion.”

[RELATED: AZ teachers wear red in push for pay raise; future strike a possibility]

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Derek StaahlDerek Staahl is an Emmy Award-winning reporter and fill-in anchor who loves covering stories that matter most to Arizona families.

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Derek Staahl

This once-uncompromising "California guy" got his first taste of Arizona in 2015 while covering spring training baseball for his former station. The trip spanned just three days, but Derek quickly decided Phoenix should be his next address. He joined CBS 5 and 3TV four months later, in August 2015. Before packing his bags for the Valley of the Sun, Derek spent nearly four years at XETV in San Diego, where he was promoted to Weekend Anchor and Investigative Reporter. Derek chaired the Saturday and Sunday 10 p.m. newscasts, which regularly earned the station's highest ratings for a news program each week. Derek’s investigative reporting efforts into the Mayor Bob Filner scandal in 2013 sparked a "governance crisis" for the city of San Diego and was profiled by the region’s top newspaper. Derek broke into the news business at WKOW-TV in Madison, WI. He wrote, shot, edited, and presented stories during the week, and produced newscasts on the weekends. By the end of his stint, he was promoted to part-time anchor on WKOW’s sister station, WMSN. Derek was born in Los Angeles and was named the “Undergraduate Broadcast Journalism Student of the Year” in his graduating class at USC. He also played quads in the school’s famous drumline. When not reporting the news, Derek enjoys playing drumset, sand volleyball, and baseball.

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