Paradise Valley teacher says her pay is nearly unlivable

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Elisabeth Milich said she posted her expected salary for next year and says it's not enough. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Elisabeth Milich said she posted her expected salary for next year and says it's not enough. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
"If you are a single person trying to make it on what we make, you couldn't do it," Milich said. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) "If you are a single person trying to make it on what we make, you couldn't do it," Milich said. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Gov. Doug Ducey was met by protesting teachers on Monday outside the KTAR studio where he gave an interview. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Gov. Doug Ducey was met by protesting teachers on Monday outside the KTAR studio where he gave an interview. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
PARADISE VALLEY, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -

A Valley teacher says the governor's claims on teachers pay in the state is just wrong.

Elisabeth Milich received her teaching certificate in 1998 and works in Paradise Valley. She recently posted on Facebook about teacher pay and she included a picture of what she is projected to make in the next year, which is just more than $35,600.  

The picture she posted is of her Performance Development slip.

[RELATED: State has budget surplus but no promises for more teacher pay raises]

"If you are a single person trying to make it on what we make, you couldn't do it," Milich said.

Gov. Doug Ducey was met by protesting teachers on Monday outside the KTAR studio where he gave an interview.

[READ MORE: Hundreds protest low teacher pay at Phoenix radio station]

He was asked about teacher pay.

"Our teacher pay last year went up 4.4 percent to an average pay of $48,000. Now, that's not enough and I want to see it rise from there," Gov. Ducey said.

[RELATED: AZ teachers wear red in push for pay raise; future strike a possibility]

Milich takes issue with this claim, saying the teachers that have been in Arizona and teaching for several years make far less than that and many are forced to take on a second or third job to pay bills.

[RELATED: Teachers argue for tax cut windfall to finance pay raises]

Milich says she hopes that something is done to better fund education and better pay for teachers.

Ducey also said that 80 percent of the new spending in the state budget is going to K-12 educations.

[READ MORE: Gov. Ducey plans to add $100M in capital funding for schools]

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