Carrington College to deliver over 400 pillows to hospitalized children

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Students made over 400 pillows for the children. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Students made over 400 pillows for the children. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
The goal of each pillow is to bring hope, encouragement and smiles to the faces of the children with congenital heart defects. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) The goal of each pillow is to bring hope, encouragement and smiles to the faces of the children with congenital heart defects. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
The pillows also to serve practical purposes such as providing body support. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) The pillows also to serve practical purposes such as providing body support. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

In order to raise awareness of congenital heart defects, approximately 110 Carrington College medical assisting students have created more than 400 heart-shaped pillows that will be delivered to Phoenix Children’s Hospital on Wednesday morning, Feb. 28.

The goal of each pillow is to bring hope, encouragement and smiles to the faces of the children with congenital heart defects, but also to serve practical purposes such as providing body support.

“When a person has open heart surgery, of course, their chest gets cut open. It’s sore, and one of the processes they have to do in recovery is cough to clear their lungs,” said Antrea Dowd, the Carrington College medical assisting program director. “So they take the heart and put the heart on their chest and they cross their arms over and they cough. And what the pillow does is it stabilizes the sternum so it doesn’t shake and vibrate and cause as much  pain on the incision.”

Congenital heart defects are the most common birth defects. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, congenital heart defects affect nearly 1 percent or about 40,000 births per year in the United States.

Dayna Murphy, a medical assisting student at Carrington College, says that it was important for her to take part in the project not only because she has a love for children, but also because it reminds her of why she got into the medical field in the first place.

“It’s also a reminder of why we’re doing what we’re doing. As medical assistants, bringing joy to other people during hard times is really why we do it,” she said.

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Copyright 2018 KPHO/KTVK (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.


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