Scottsdale residents sound off on new bike share program at transportation meeting

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Some people in Scottsdale have complained that bike share bicycles are being left all over the city. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Some people in Scottsdale have complained that bike share bicycles are being left all over the city. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
On Thursday night, the City of Scottsdale's Transportation Commission held a public meeting addressing the issue. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) On Thursday night, the City of Scottsdale's Transportation Commission held a public meeting addressing the issue. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
A City of Scottsdale aid says they'll only take action against the companies if they don't obey the laws. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) A City of Scottsdale aid says they'll only take action against the companies if they don't obey the laws. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
"It looks like a cluttered junkyard," one Scottsdale resident said of the program. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) "It looks like a cluttered junkyard," one Scottsdale resident said of the program. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
SCOTTSDALE, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -

A bike share program in Scottsdale is incredibly popular. You pick up a bike and leave it almost anywhere you want. But the biggest convenience is also a nuisance for some residents.

"We live right down the street and they're literally everywhere, super convenient," said Trey Orear, who used LimeBike, one of three dockless bike share companies operating in Scottsdale, for the first time Thursday.

[ORIGINAL STORY: A new type of bike sharing coming to Scottsdale]

"You get on the app on your phone and you just walk to it," he said.

They don't use any taxpayer money, unlike other cities that use designated docking stations.

[RELATED: GRID Bike Share program expands with Tempe launch]

But no docks means people leave them wherever they want. 

On Thursday night, the City of Scottsdale's Transportation Commission held a public meeting addressing the issue. 

[RELATED: Not everyone's on board with Scottsdale's new bike share program]

"It looks like a cluttered junkyard," one Scottsdale resident said of the program.

"We had a bike left outside our house and it stayed there for 10 days," a gentleman said.

The bikes are supposed to be left in a safe spot - not blocking a sidewalk, or on private property.  Now they’re even being left in neighboring cities. 

"I was in Arcadia just yesterday alone, two bikes, one in the street, and one in an alley," said Phoenix Councilman Sal DiCiccio. He said he’ll be meeting with one of the companies next week.

"We want to encourage people to ride bikes, but they just can't leave these bikes on other people’s property," DiCiccio said.

On Thursday, Paul Vidal, the general manager for one of the companies, Ofo, said Scottsdale has been the biggest market in terms of rides per bike in the entire United States.

"Right now, I have a staff of 12 people and their sole job within the city limits of Scottsdale is to look around look at the bikes that we use our technology to find where they are broken or obstruction, and fix them, we call that rebalancing," Vidal said. "I’m going to invest more in that."

A City of Scottsdale aide says they'll only take action against the companies if they don't obey the laws. 

The chairman of the Transportation Board said he likes the idea of dockless companies, but they need to teach their customers where to leave the bikes.

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Lindsey ReiserLindsey Reiser is a Scottsdale native and an award-winning multimedia journalist.

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Lindsey Reiser

Lindsey returned to the Valley in 2010 after covering border and immigration issues in El Paso, TX. While in El Paso she investigated public corruption, uncovered poor business practices, and routinely reported on the violence across the border.

Lindsey feels honored to have several awards under her belt, including a Society of Professional Journalists Mark of Excellence Award, Hearst Journalist Award, and several National Broadcast Education Association Awards.

Lindsey is a graduate of the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University, and she currently serves as a mentor to journalism students. She studied for a semester in Alicante, Spain and also earned a degree in Spanish at ASU.

She is proud to serve as a member of United Blood Services’ Community Leadership Council, a volunteer advisory board for the UBS of Arizona.

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