Romanian 'Dreamer' shares stresses, hopes for DACA program

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Cintia earned her bachelor's degree in finance and economics from Grand Canyon University. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Cintia earned her bachelor's degree in finance and economics from Grand Canyon University. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Cintia wants to change the rhetoric and show that it's people from all over the world who rely on the program. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Cintia wants to change the rhetoric and show that it's people from all over the world who rely on the program. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
The future of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program is unclear. (Source: CNN) The future of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program is unclear. (Source: CNN)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

Over the past few months, "Dreamers" have seen a lot of back and forth about their future in this country. 

President Donald Trump says the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program is "probably dead," but applications for renewal are back open for the first time since October, at least for now.

[READ MORE: Trump administration resumes accepting DACA renewals]

Most DACA recipients are from Mexico, El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras. Now a young Phoenix woman is sharing her family's story, saying she wants to show that the DACA program is affecting people from all over the world. 

"It's my bachelor's in finance and economics from Grand Canyon University. My blood, sweat and tears on a piece of paper," said 22-year-old Cintia.

Three and a half years of hard work summed up in a college diploma. It's something Cintia never thought she'd get to hold.

Her family came to the U.S. from Romania legally in 2004 and applied for citizenship. But because of a paperwork error, it fell through, and suddenly, legal became illegal. 

[RELATED: On shutdown and DACA fix, more questions than answers]

"We didn't have anything to go back to. There was nothing there. We sold our apartment, sold our cars," said Cintia. 

Then six years ago, a bit of relief. She applied for DACA, and through it, was able to attend college.

"I tried to keep my GPA high because that's literally the only thing that was paying for my college tuition was just the merit-based scholarships," said Cintia. "Everything else was out of pocket." 

With the future of DACA in question, Cintia wants to change the rhetoric and show that it's people from all over the world who rely on the program. 

"Everyone thinks that DACA is strictly for Hispanic people, for people that come here from Mexico," she said. "I wanted to show that there's not one face of DACA, it's multiple people. It's people from all over the world, from all walks of life that come here. The only thing they have in common is they want a better life. All the parents want to make a better life for their children. It's not a one-size-fits-all program." 

She hopes someday DACA will become a pathway to citizenship.

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Lauren ReimerLauren Reimer joined the 3TV/CBS 5 family in June 2016. She is originally from Racine, WI but is no stranger to our heat.

Click to learn more about Lauren.

Lauren Reimer

She previously worked for KVOA in Tucson, covering topics that matter to Arizonans including the monsoon, wildfires and border issues. During the child migrant crisis of 2014, Reimer was one of only a handful of journalists given access to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection detention facility in Nogales, where hundreds of unaccompanied children were being held after crossing into the U.S. from Central America. Before that, Reimer worked at WREX in Rockford, IL. Lauren is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee and still visits home often. When not chasing news stories, Reimer loves to explore, enjoying everything from trying new adventurous foods to visiting state and national parks or local places of historical significance.

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