Fewer shots fired around midnight on New Year's Eve

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Two people were arrested specifically for firing a gun into the air: Samantha Lewis-Nearhood, 27, and Carter Moore, 34.  (Source: Maricopa County Sheriff's Office) Two people were arrested specifically for firing a gun into the air: Samantha Lewis-Nearhood, 27, and Carter Moore, 34.  (Source: Maricopa County Sheriff's Office)
Mug shot of Carter Moore, 34. (Source: Maricopa County Sheriff's Office) Mug shot of Carter Moore, 34. (Source: Maricopa County Sheriff's Office)
Mug shot of Samantha Lewis-Nearhood, 27. (Source: Maricopa County Sheriff's Office) Mug shot of Samantha Lewis-Nearhood, 27. (Source: Maricopa County Sheriff's Office)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

It looks like many people are finally wising up about firing gunshots into the air on New Year's Eve.

The Phoenix Police Department released its Shannon’s Law statistics Thursday.

The department found that fewer shots were fired on the most recent New Year's Eve than last year.

In fact, the decrease in "shots fired" calls dropped 33.7 percent.

In the four-hour period from 10 p.m. on New Year’s Eve until 2 a.m. on New Year’s Day, police received 240 calls regarding gunfire. 

On New Year's Eve 2016, 362 shots were fired.

[2016 STORY: More gunfire reported over New Year's Eve this year]

Two people were arrested specifically for firing a gun into the air: Samantha Lewis-Nearhood, 27, and Carter Moore, 34

"What is important to consider is that each 'call' does not necessarily equate to a bullet fired," police tell us. "Our increased efforts in education and prevention measures include encouraging citizens to report when they hear shots fired within the city limits. Each shot could generate multiple duplicate calls. Although increased reporting could raise the number of calls for service, our goal is to reduce the actual number of shots fired into the air."

The Phoenix Police Department has continued an annual effort to educate the community and enforce laws concerning gunfire within the city limits. 

Shannon’s Law was brought about after the 1999 death of a young Valley girl who was struck by a falling bullet while in her backyard. 

[RELATED: Senate leader axes bill weakening 'Shannon's Law' on gunfire]

ARS 13-3107 (Shannon’s Law) makes it a felony to fire a gun within or into a city’s limits in Arizona. Through door-to-door contacts, flyer distribution, and social media, the Phoenix Police Department has a vested interest in efforts to eliminate celebratory and random gunfire during New Year's celebrations and throughout the year.

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