Does it snow in Phoenix? The answer may surprise you!

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It hasn't snowed in downtown Phoenix since the 1930s. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) It hasn't snowed in downtown Phoenix since the 1930s. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
(3TV/CBS 5) -

Phoenix, of course, is known for its blazing hot summers, but is it possible to see snow here?

The answer may be a bit surprising to some!

Yes, it has actually snowed in Phoenix.

[MOBILE/APP USERS: Click/tap here to see old picture of snow in Phoenix]

The most snow Phoenix has ever seen was 1 inch on Jan. 20, 1933, and then again in January of 1937.

In 1937, about an inch fell in areas of downtown Phoenix and several inches fell in areas that were then undeveloped areas of the Valley.

[SPECIAL SECTION: Weather blog]

As you can imagine, it didn't last for very long or accumulate much. But reports during the event stated the snow remained for a couple of days in shaded areas.

[RELATED: Snowbowl bypasses Mother Nature, makes own snow for opening]

[MOBILE/APP USERS: Click/tap here to see photo of snow on the Superstition Mountains]

We can see better snowfall in the foothills and over the Superstition Mountains that sit at about 5,000 feet.

[RELATED: When will it snow in Arizona?]

The most recent significant snow was in 1998. In December of that year, .22 inch of snow fell on the northwestern half of the Valley, according to the National Weather Service office in Phoenix.

So we don't see it often, but if you are really, really lucky, you could see a white Christmas in Phoenix!

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Copyright 2017 KPHO/KTVK (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.


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Ian SchwartzAn Arizona native, born and raised in Mesa, and graduation of Arizona State University, Ian Schwartz is thrilled to be back in the Valley of the Sun.

Click to learn more about Ian.

Ian Schwartz
Wake Up Meteorologist

After starting his journalism career in Illinois, Ian worked in Albuquerque and later Sacramento. In the field as a reporter, he has covered flash floods, blizzards, tornadoes, wildfires, drought and just about everything the weather can offer. After spending some time reporting, Ian decided to further his education and completed Mississippi State's broadcast meteorology program. Ian loves everything about Arizona weather from winter storms in the north to the monsoon in the south. When Ian isn't giving you the forecast in the morning, you can find him hiking, traveling and exploring everything our great state has to offer. If you have any weather pictures or want to say hi, drop him an email or connect online.

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