ADEQ extends high pollution advisory through Friday

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That hazy brown cloud still hovering over the Valley means there's some serious pollution in the air. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) That hazy brown cloud still hovering over the Valley means there's some serious pollution in the air. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Arizona Department of Environmental Quality has extended its high pollution advisory for Maricopa County through Friday. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Arizona Department of Environmental Quality has extended its high pollution advisory for Maricopa County through Friday. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
The advisory means dust and pollutant levels may exceed federal health standards and that can be dangerous for people. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) The advisory means dust and pollutant levels may exceed federal health standards and that can be dangerous for people. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

There's something in the air and it's not good.

"I have noticed it, and I just thought it was allergies or something going on," said Mario Murillo of Phoenix.

That hazy brown cloud still hovering over the Valley means there's some serious pollution in the air.

Arizona Department of Environmental Quality has extended its high pollution advisory for Maricopa County through Friday.

The advisory means dust and pollutant levels may exceed federal health standards and that can be dangerous for people like Sharon Reiger, who already has some health issues.

"It's harder to breathe," said Reiger. "I have a little pain in my chest. It's difficult."

The pollution can also be a problem for kids.

Joey Velasquez is making sure her 4-year-old son Francisco doesn't spend too much time on the playground.

Francisco has asthma.

"When he runs a lot, he starts wheezing," said Velasquez. "You have to be careful, especially on days like today."

ADEQ Air Quality Division Director Tim Franquist said there are a number of reasons for all the pollution in the air.

The lack of rain over the past three months, very little wind to blow pollutants away and the recent cloud cover keeping all the dust and dirt in one place.

Franquist said we need rain now.

"Certainly air quality folks are hoping some wind and rain kind of move dust particles out of the area," said Franquist. "The rain helps scrub the air particles, and so the combination of decent wind and rain would really help the cause."

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Jason Barry
Jason Barry has been reporting in the Valley since 1997.

Click to learn more about Jason.

Jason Barry

Jason Barry has been reporting in the Valley since 1997.

He is a nine-time Rocky Mountain Emmy Award winner who is best known for his weekly Dirty Dining reports, which highlight local restaurants with major health code violations.

Jason was born in Los Angeles and graduated from the University of Miami.

An avid sports fan, Jason follows the Diamondbacks, Cardinals and Suns with his wife, Karen, and son, Joshua.

His favorite stories to cover are the station’s Pay it Forward segments, which reward members of the community with $500 for going ‘above and beyond’ the call of duty to help others.

Jason, started his career at WBTW-TV in Florence, SC before moving to WALA-TV in Mobile, AL, was named the Associated Press Reporter of the Year in 2002.

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