Hearts used to fight hacking

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One ASU professor thinks he has found the ultimate way to deter hackers and its by using your own heart. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) One ASU professor thinks he has found the ultimate way to deter hackers and its by using your own heart. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Each human heart has its own kind of signature to that individual and the way to determine that is through our electrocardiogram. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Each human heart has its own kind of signature to that individual and the way to determine that is through our electrocardiogram. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Jae-Sun Seo has come up with a tiny chip that can be put inside a wearable device like a Fitbit. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Jae-Sun Seo has come up with a tiny chip that can be put inside a wearable device like a Fitbit. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
The technology is really a leap into the future when it comes to preventing our personal information from being stolen. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) The technology is really a leap into the future when it comes to preventing our personal information from being stolen. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
TEMPE, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -

There are a lot of methods used to find out who a person is.

You have biometric methods including facial recognition, fingerprint and retinal scanners. Well, one ASU professor thinks he has found the ultimate way to deter hackers and it's by using your own heart.

Each human heart has its own kind of signature to that individual and the way to determine that is through our electrocardiogram.  

Asst. professor Jae-Sun Seo in the School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering has come up with a tiny chip that can be put inside a wearable device like a Fitbit.

"We're exploiting the fact that some of the ECG signals from myself and another person are slightly different so we're trying to use the ECG signals to indicate individuals," Seo said.

The FBI says that medical records hacking is exploding and will continue to rise in the coming years. 

"Security is critical for a lot of these mobile devices and especially that's important for recent wearable devices that gather and monitor your own private health information," Seo said.

The tiny chip is about 2.5 by 2.5 millimeters and is packaged into a small chip which could be installed into a wearable device and possibly a mobile phone in the future.  

The technology is really a leap into the future when it comes to preventing our personal information from being stolen. The chip is being developed by ASU and Samsung. While it's still in the testing phase, it could eventually become a huge game changer.

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