Man flees to Phoenix amid the hurricane aftermath in Puerto Rico

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Jeffrey Wilson is in Phoenix for a few weeks to get his finances in order and visit friends and family. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Jeffrey Wilson is in Phoenix for a few weeks to get his finances in order and visit friends and family. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Wilson says he didn't get his water back until day nine. (Source: CNN) Wilson says he didn't get his water back until day nine. (Source: CNN)
Lack of communication is the reason he came to the mainland. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Lack of communication is the reason he came to the mainland. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Experts say Puerto Rico could now see a big drop in population for the next decade or more. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Experts say Puerto Rico could now see a big drop in population for the next decade or more. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

It's been two months since Hurricane Maria ripped through Puerto Rico, and many still don't have electricity. The conditions have prompted many people to flee, some coming right here to the Valley.

Jeffrey Wilson is in Phoenix for a few weeks to get his finances in order and visit friends and family. He moved to Puerto Rico over three years ago and loves it. However, the past few months have been far from the paradise he now calls home.

[RELATED: Puerto Rico devastated, Phoenix restaurant steps up to help]

Power is still the biggest hurdle for the island, but Wilson says the problems don’t end with electricity.

“Twenty percent still don’t have water,” says Wilson. “I was using rainwater to flush my toilet and I got my water back at day nine.”

[RELATED: What Maria Washed Away: Puerto Ricans Resettle in Arizona]

Lack of communication is the reason he came to the mainland. After the hurricane hit, his friends and family had to wait a long time to know he was OK.

“Ten days before I could call my girlfriend,” says Wilson, “I was one of the thousands of people that nobody knew was alive or not.”

[RELATED: Phoenix DJ learns family in Puerto Rico is safe thanks to listener]

Experts say Puerto Rico could now see a big drop in population for the next decade or more – people like Wilson who choose to leave the catastrophic conditions.

However, Wilson says he plans on returning in a couple of weeks.

“It’s a wonderful place and Puerto Ricans are good people and they need help,” says Wilson.

[RELATED: Corporate donations for Hurricane Maria relief top $24 million]

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