Arizona winemaker ready to help friends in fire-devastated California

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Eric Glomski is ready to help his friends in northern California impacted by the wildfires. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Eric Glomski is ready to help his friends in northern California impacted by the wildfires. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Before opening his estate vineyard, Glomski learned winemaking in Sonoma County. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Before opening his estate vineyard, Glomski learned winemaking in Sonoma County. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Glomski just finished his harvest, while Napa Valley harvested about 90 percent of its crops before the fires erupted. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Glomski just finished his harvest, while Napa Valley harvested about 90 percent of its crops before the fires erupted. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Even if spared by the flames, the grapes on the vine could still be ruined. (Source: CNN) Even if spared by the flames, the grapes on the vine could still be ruined. (Source: CNN)
CORNVILLE, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -

In addition to the lives lost and the homes burned down, more than a dozen vineyards in Northern California are either damaged or destroyed.

"Obviously, the first thing you think about is people and their safety, and after that, it's, OK, 'How's your vineyard? How's your winery, how's your home?'" said Eric Glomski, owner of Page Springs Vineyard and Cellars in Cornville.  

Before opening his estate vineyard, Glomski learned winemaking in Sonoma County. Right now, his friends are hurting.

[READ MORE: California fires: Searchers seek hundreds of missing]

Some of his friends in California wine country told him the once-lush vegetation now resembles a moonscape. 

"One good friend who we buy our corks from, his house and his whole neighborhood has burned to the ground," Glomski said.

[READ MORE: Winds whip new terror into deadly California wildfires]

Glomski just finished his harvest, while Napa Valley harvested about 90 percent of its crops before the fires erupted. Even if spared by the flames, the grapes on the vine could still be ruined.

"The smoke creates all kinds of taints in wines, too, so there's a lot of secondary damage for those people," he said.

[RELATED: Survival stories start to emerge amid destruction from wildfires]

Glomski said it's not just charred vineyards that are a loss, but also the entire experience that an estate offers. 

"If your estate vineyard burns down, it's like losing your house, and the wine you've crafted, the artistry," he said.

[RELATED: Napa businesses rally to help the community]

But he added that the winemaking community is a tight-knit one, and he will help out wherever possible, from consciously buying supplies from those affected, to just sending a friend a bottle of wine.

"I just hope people are getting the support they need out there," he said.

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Lindsey ReiserLindsey Reiser is a Scottsdale native and an award-winning multimedia journalist.

Click to learn more about Lindsey

Lindsey Reiser

Lindsey returned to the Valley in 2010 after covering border and immigration issues in El Paso, TX. While in El Paso she investigated public corruption, uncovered poor business practices, and routinely reported on the violence across the border.

Lindsey feels honored to have several awards under her belt, including a Society of Professional Journalists Mark of Excellence Award, Hearst Journalist Award, and several National Broadcast Education Association Awards.

Lindsey is a graduate of the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University, and she currently serves as a mentor to journalism students. She studied for a semester in Alicante, Spain and also earned a degree in Spanish at ASU.

She is proud to serve as a member of United Blood Services’ Community Leadership Council, a volunteer advisory board for the UBS of Arizona.

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