Congresswoman begins 800-mile hike of Arizona Trail

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Rep. Martha McSally, R-Tucson, said a working group she chairs on women in the workforce is trying to find “the real root cause” of the gender pay disparity, whether that’s discrimination or other workplace barriers. (Source: Anthony Marroquin/Cronkite) Rep. Martha McSally, R-Tucson, said a working group she chairs on women in the workforce is trying to find “the real root cause” of the gender pay disparity, whether that’s discrimination or other workplace barriers. (Source: Anthony Marroquin/Cronkite)
SIERRA VISTA, AZ (AP) -

Arizona Congresswoman Martha McSally is running for re-election but she's also walking.

McSally on Saturday began hiking the 800-mile (1,287-kilometer) Arizona Trail in segments by completing a 3.6-mile (near 6-kilometer) segment within Coronado National Memorial near Sierra Vista in Cochise County.

[READ MORE: Rep. McSally starts AZ Trail hike on National Public Lands Day]

[SPECIAL SECTION: Arizona politics]

The trail links extends from Utah on the north to Mexico on the south.

The 2nd Congressional District Republican says her hike will highlight the significance of the trail and of public lands and what she says is need to keep those lands open to the public.

[RELATED: Rep. McSally takes jab at Speaker's lobby dress code]

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