Autistic teen detained by Buckeye police speaks about confrontation

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A autistic teen detained by police speaks about confrontation. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) A autistic teen detained by police speaks about confrontation. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Photos from Connor's lawyer show larges scrapes on his back and the back of his right arm, as well as a scrape near his right eye. (Source: Connor's family) Photos from Connor's lawyer show larges scrapes on his back and the back of his right arm, as well as a scrape near his right eye. (Source: Connor's family)
Connor and Danielle talked to CBS' Jamie Yuccas. (Source: CBS) Connor and Danielle talked to CBS' Jamie Yuccas. (Source: CBS)
The officer mistook Connor's mannerisms for drug-related behavior. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) The officer mistook Connor's mannerisms for drug-related behavior. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
BUCKEYE, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -

An autistic teenager who had a controversial confrontation with a Buckeye police officer spoke about the incident that he said left him with cuts and bruises.

Ofc. Grossman went up to 14-year-old Connor Leible, who was alone in a park near Village and Main streets on July 19, and asked him what he was doing.

"I'm stimming," Connor can be heard saying in the body camera video.

He was playing with string, a form of what's called stimming, or self-stimulation that many autistic people do to calm themselves.

The officer mistook Connor's mannerisms for drug-related behavior and the officer asked for Connor's ID but he didn't have any. 

The teen started to walk away when Grossman grabbed Connor's wrist and the teen can be heard screaming. The two were then on the ground for about 2 minutes. Police said they fell but the family's attorney said the police officer slammed him to the ground.

[READ MORE: Police release body-cam video of Buckeye cop's detention of teen with autism]

"It was really hard to watch that, that's my, that's my baby," said Connor's mother Danielle when asked about the body camera video.

Photos from Connor's lawyer show larges scrapes on his back and the back of his right arm, as well as a scrape near his right eye. Danielle said Connor has an ankle injury that may require surgery.

"He pushed me down on the grass and he just hit me on the tree and tackled me and then he didn't stop," said Connor. "It made me feel sad."

The Buckeye Police Department's internal investigation cleared the officer of wrongdoing, finding there was no excessive use of force and because of his training as a drug recognition expert, they determined it was a reasonable stop.

"I hope the family sees that we will learn from this incident. We are human and things are constantly evolving and changing and it's almost impossible to know and understand every single little piece of every single disorder," said Det. Tamela Skaggs with the Buckeye Police Department.

"They say nothing was wrong, he didn't do anything wrong, but we're going to make sure we handle it differently. Why would you need to handle it differently if everything was done correctly the first time?" said Danielle.

The Buckeye Police Department said its officers are trained to handle interactions with people who have disabilities, but they are looking for ways to improve their training procedures.

Asked how he feels about police officers now, Connor said, "A different kind makes me happy."

"But the one police officer was mean to me. It makes me feel sad," he said.

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