A first-hand account of the deadly central Mexico earthquake

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A 7.1 magnitude earthquake struck central Mexico on Tuesday, collapsing buildings into dust and killing hundreds. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) A 7.1 magnitude earthquake struck central Mexico on Tuesday, collapsing buildings into dust and killing hundreds. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
3TV/CBS 5's photographer Juan Magaña was there to witness first-hand the terror and destruction this devastating earthquake caused. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) 3TV/CBS 5's photographer Juan Magaña was there to witness first-hand the terror and destruction this devastating earthquake caused. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
When Magaña went to return to his hotel, he had to take a bus back because the light rail wasn't running due to the electricity being out from the earthquake. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) When Magaña went to return to his hotel, he had to take a bus back because the light rail wasn't running due to the electricity being out from the earthquake. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Like so many others, Magaña is waiting for engineers to inspect the hotel to see if it is safe to stay inside there and at the same time, concerned about aftershocks in the night. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Like so many others, Magaña is waiting for engineers to inspect the hotel to see if it is safe to stay inside there and at the same time, concerned about aftershocks in the night. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
MEXICO CITY (3TV/CBS 5/AP) -

A 7.1 magnitude earthquake struck central Mexico on Tuesday, collapsing buildings into dust and killing hundreds. Azfamily's photographer Juan Magaña was there to witness first-hand the terror and destruction this devastating earthquake caused.

Magaña was visiting Mexico City for vacation and was inside a Basilica when the earth shook.

"Nobody expects something like this," said Magaña. "We were out having a great time and next thing you know, we're running for our lives."

[RELATED: 7.1 magnitude quake kills 248 as buildings crumble in Mexico]

According to Mexico City Mayor Miguel Angel Mancera, buildings fell at 44 places in the capital alone as high-rises across the city swayed sickeningly.

"It was unbelievable to feel the ground shake," said Magaña. "Stuff started to hit the ground, we took off running. We could hear the building shaking so we ran to the middle of the street."

The quake is the deadliest in Mexico since a 1985 quake on the same date killed thousands. It came less than two weeks after another powerful quake caused 90 deaths in the country's south.

When Magaña went to return to his hotel, he had to take a bus back because the light rail wasn't running due to the electricity being out from the earthquake. During the bus ride back, Magaña passed piles of rubble with rescue efforts underway.

"We saw this one house where the bricks fell off from the top and hit a car, shattering the glass," said Magaña.

Like so many others, Magaña is waiting for engineers to inspect the hotel to see if it is safe to stay inside there and at the same time, concerned about aftershocks in the night.

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