Two weeks after Trump rally, conversation continues publicly and privately about police tactics

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A much smaller and calmer meeting was held Tuesday in regard to the police response to the anti-Trump protest late last month. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) A much smaller and calmer meeting was held Tuesday in regard to the police response to the anti-Trump protest late last month. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Several speakers voiced displeasure with the police response at a community listening session with Chief Jeri Williams on Tuesday night at Steele Indian School Park. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Several speakers voiced displeasure with the police response at a community listening session with Chief Jeri Williams on Tuesday night at Steele Indian School Park. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
The tone at Tuesday's meeting was drastically different from last week’s raucous City Council meeting. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) The tone at Tuesday's meeting was drastically different from last week’s raucous City Council meeting. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Representatives from Puente, the ACLU and other groups met privately with Chief Williams and Mayor Greg Stanton at Arizona State University before the public meeting. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Representatives from Puente, the ACLU and other groups met privately with Chief Williams and Mayor Greg Stanton at Arizona State University before the public meeting. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Discussion over the police response will extend to Wednesday’s City Council meeting. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Discussion over the police response will extend to Wednesday’s City Council meeting. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

It’s been two weeks since Phoenix police broke up the protests outside President Trump’s rally with tear gas and pepper balls, and the conversation about those crowd control tactics continues.

Several speakers voiced displeasure with the police response at a community listening session with Chief Jeri Williams on Tuesday night at Steele Indian School Park.

[READ MORE: 4 arrested, 2 officers suffer heat exhaustion after protest turns unruly outside Trump rally]

“My only comment for future protests would be to come up with some sort of more effective warning system -- loudspeakers, big signs, something – because we got nothing, and I was very surprised,” said one woman.

Other speakers called for an independent investigation of the police actions on Aug. 22.

[RELATED: Phoenix PD does play-by-play of video of unruly anti-Trump protest]

The tone was drastically different from last week’s raucous City Council meeting, where protesters from the Puente Movement and other groups commandeered the meeting with chants, and angrily sounded off for more than five hours.

[RAW VIDEO: Community members speak to Phoenix City Council about police response to anti-Trump rally]

Puente and other outspoken groups were noticeably absent from Tuesday’s public listening session. Representatives from Puente, the ACLU and other groups met privately with Chief Williams and Mayor Greg Stanton at Arizona State University before the public meeting.

[RAW VIDEO: Rev. Jarrett Maupin rips Phoenix police over response to anti-Trump protest]

Chief Williams, Puente, and the ACLU declined to discuss the private meeting afterward.

Discussion over the police response will extend to Wednesday’s City Council meeting. A group called Rally for Law Enforcement announced it will speak out at the meeting in support of the Phoenix Police Department.

[SLIDESHOW: Police deploy tear gas at Trump protesters]

“The Phoenix Police Department did a good job in keeping the public safe that day and you can expect police supporters to echo that sentiment at the next City Council meeting. We will let the Mayor and the City Council members know that Phoenix PD has support and that the protesters that took over last week’s meeting definitely do not represent the majority of the community,” said Nohl Rosen, the group’s founder.

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Derek StaahlDerek Staahl is an Emmy Award-winning reporter and fill-in anchor who loves covering stories that matter most to Arizona families.

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Derek Staahl

This once-uncompromising "California guy" got his first taste of Arizona in 2015 while covering spring training baseball for his former station. The trip spanned just three days, but Derek quickly decided Phoenix should be his next address. He joined CBS 5 and 3TV four months later, in August 2015. Before packing his bags for the Valley of the Sun, Derek spent nearly four years at XETV in San Diego, where he was promoted to Weekend Anchor and Investigative Reporter. Derek chaired the Saturday and Sunday 10 p.m. newscasts, which regularly earned the station's highest ratings for a news program each week. Derek’s investigative reporting efforts into the Mayor Bob Filner scandal in 2013 sparked a "governance crisis" for the city of San Diego and was profiled by the region’s top newspaper. Derek broke into the news business at WKOW-TV in Madison, WI. He wrote, shot, edited, and presented stories during the week, and produced newscasts on the weekends. By the end of his stint, he was promoted to part-time anchor on WKOW’s sister station, WMSN. Derek was born in Los Angeles and was named the “Undergraduate Broadcast Journalism Student of the Year” in his graduating class at USC. He also played quads in the school’s famous drumline. When not reporting the news, Derek enjoys playing drumset, sand volleyball, and baseball.

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