Solar eclipse viewing parties expand across the Valley

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The solar eclipse spawned many viewing parties. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5 News) The solar eclipse spawned many viewing parties. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5 News)
The solar eclipse was viewed by many around the Valley. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5 News) The solar eclipse was viewed by many around the Valley. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5 News)
Solar eclipse party on the front lawn. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5 News) Solar eclipse party on the front lawn. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5 News)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

They climbed to the top of mountains for a better view.

Skipped school with their special glasses.

Hosted parties across town...

It was hard to go anywhere Monday morning without seeing someone looking up to catch a glimpse of the solar eclipse.

[SPECIAL SECTION: TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017]

"It looks like someone was eating the sun, almost like it was a cookie," said 11-year-old Jack McDugall.

"Its awe inspiring to see such a cool thing happen up in the sky," said Nikki Territo, of Scottsdale.

One of the biggest gatherings was at the Arizona Science Center, where kids from across the Valley got the ultimate hands on science class.

A number of schools like Madison Meadows Middle School in Phoenix created pinhole boxes and eclipse projectors to keep kids from looking directly at the sun.

"With us, we didn't look directly at it," said science teacher Peter Samuel.  "Most kids didn't have glasses, but its just as exciting for them. They've never seen anything like it."

"At 1st it just looked like an orange crescent, but you could actually see flares coming off the moon and its really cool," said student Daisy Marshall

But some school districts like Scottsdale Unified didn't want to take any chances with students looking up, so they had all their children stay inside, and that didn't go over well with parents like Beth Kramer, who hosted  a solar eclipse viewing party so her kids and their classmates could actually experience the  rare event.

"Once we found out the kids weren't going to be able to experience it today, we decided lets make an event of it and keep kids out of school for half a day and turn it into a science and mathematics lesson."

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Jason Barry
Jason Barry has been reporting in the Valley since 1997.

Click to learn more about Jason.

Jason Barry

Jason Barry has been reporting in the Valley since 1997.

He is a nine-time Rocky Mountain Emmy Award winner who is best known for his weekly Dirty Dining reports, which highlight local restaurants with major health code violations.

Jason was born in Los Angeles and graduated from the University of Miami.

An avid sports fan, Jason follows the Diamondbacks, Cardinals and Suns with his wife, Karen, and son, Joshua.

His favorite stories to cover are the station’s Pay it Forward segments, which reward members of the community with $500 for going ‘above and beyond’ the call of duty to help others.

Jason, started his career at WBTW-TV in Florence, SC before moving to WALA-TV in Mobile, AL, was named the Associated Press Reporter of the Year in 2002.

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