High-profile white nationalist calls Maricopa home

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Harry Hughes is the Southwest regional leader of the National Socialist Movement. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5 and NSM88.org0 Harry Hughes is the Southwest regional leader of the National Socialist Movement. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5 and NSM88.org0
Hughes said his organization and the pro-white movement are misrepresented and misunderstood. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Hughes said his organization and the pro-white movement are misrepresented and misunderstood. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
The logo for the National Socialist Movement, also called the NSM (Source: Anti-Defamation League) The logo for the National Socialist Movement, also called the NSM (Source: Anti-Defamation League)
'A nationalist looks out for what is best for their country, not for the rest of the world,' Hughes said. 'A nationalist looks out for what is best for their country, not for the rest of the world,' Hughes said.
NSM supporter patch (left) and NSM official patch featuring new design with Othala Rune, sometimes called 'the new swastika' (Source: NSM88.org) NSM supporter patch (left) and NSM official patch featuring new design with Othala Rune, sometimes called 'the new swastika' (Source: NSM88.org)
MARICOPA, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -

A high profile white nationalist lives just south of Phoenix in a rural area in Maricopa.

Harry Hughes is the Southwest regional leader of the National Socialist Movement. The organization is considered a hate group by both the Anti-Defamation League and the Southern Poverty Law Center.

Hughes said his organization and the pro-white movement are misrepresented and misunderstood.

“I don’t consider myself part of a hate group. I don’t consider the organization a hate group. I don’t actively go out and hate on people based on physical characteristics, national origins or religious beliefs,” said Hughes.

But the NSM bars Jewish people, homosexuals and anyone not of European descent from becoming a member. Hughes admits that is racism to a degree, but points out that other organizations have membership criteria.

[RELATED: The Southern Poverty Law Center's list of hate groups near you

[RELATED: These are the new symbols of hate]

“A nationalist looks out for what is best for their country, not for the rest of the world. The United States has become, in many ways, an empire projecting itself upon the rest of the planet. I think that's wrong. We should be more focused on us,” said Hughes.

Hughes said he believes the white race is headed toward being oppressed and that whites, as a majority, no longer have a real voice in this country anymore.

He decries the terms Nazi, white supremacist and neo-Nazi. He explains his belief that those are buzz words, derogatory terms used by those who do not share pro-white belief to incite fear.

According to Hughes, Donald Trump ran for president on 80 percent of the NSM platform. Hughes does not consider Trump a racist and said the president’s positions on issues have not emboldened his organization.

The recent violence in Charlottesville, VA is something Hughes said he believes was the result of counter-protests inciting trouble with the pro-white groups.

[READ MORE: Protesters blame Charlottesville police for not stopping violence]

“When the leftists have their events and rallies and things, we don't go to counter protest them. We don't show up to antagonize them. We let them do their own thing in peace,” said Hughes.

[RELATED: Trump says both sides to blame amid Charlottesville backlash]

Hughes has no plans to attend the president’s visit to downtown Phoenix next week. But he does not rule out the possibility that there will be trouble in the streets.

“I expect there to be some arrests. People will be arrested there. I can almost guarantee there will be people sitting in jail who went to the Trump rally,” said Hughes. 

[READ MORE: Police preparing for demonstrators during Trump visit]


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