Bomb shelters could make comeback as tensions rise with North Korea

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The rising tension with North Korea has raised concerns in the U.S., unlike anything since the Cold War.  Back in the 1950's, 1960's and 1970's, bomb shelters were a big deal.  And now, they could be making a comeback. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) The rising tension with North Korea has raised concerns in the U.S., unlike anything since the Cold War. Back in the 1950's, 1960's and 1970's, bomb shelters were a big deal. And now, they could be making a comeback. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Gary Fetters is co-owner of Division 1 Bunkers in Litchfield Park, a company that specializes in building basements, shelters and safe rooms on residential and commercial properties. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Gary Fetters is co-owner of Division 1 Bunkers in Litchfield Park, a company that specializes in building basements, shelters and safe rooms on residential and commercial properties. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
The bunkers come in all shapes and sizes and are designed to withstand a natural disaster, fire, even a bomb blast. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) The bunkers come in all shapes and sizes and are designed to withstand a natural disaster, fire, even a bomb blast. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
LITCHFIELD PARK, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -

The rising tension with North Korea has raised concerns in the U.S., unlike anything since the Cold War.

Back in the 1950's, 1960's and 1970's, bomb shelters were a big deal.

And now, they could be making a comeback.

Gary Fetters is co-owner of Division 1 Bunkers in Litchfield Park, a company that specializes in building basements, shelters and safe rooms on residential and commercial properties.

"Sometimes the backroom, sometimes it's a big closet," said Fetters. "I got two in Glendale, houses side-by-side with mother and father and their kids. Both have walk-in closets that are shelters."

The bunkers come in all shapes and sizes and are designed to withstand a natural disaster, fire, even a bomb blast.

Fetters said the number of people inquiring about a bunker or bomb shelter has increased dramatically recently, and thinks that could be directly linked to world events and the threat of nuclear war with North Korea.

"I do anticipate an increase in shelters and bomb shelters," said Fetter. "A definite increase in the level of protection in people's homes."

The cost to build a bomb shelter or fortified bunker can range from $10,000 to $200,000, Fetters said.

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Jason Barry
Jason Barry has been reporting in the Valley since 1997.

Click to learn more about Jason.

Jason Barry

Jason Barry has been reporting in the Valley since 1997.

He is a nine-time Rocky Mountain Emmy Award winner who is best known for his weekly Dirty Dining reports, which highlight local restaurants with major health code violations.

Jason was born in Los Angeles and graduated from the University of Miami.

An avid sports fan, Jason follows the Diamondbacks, Cardinals and Suns with his wife, Karen, and son, Joshua.

His favorite stories to cover are the station’s Pay it Forward segments, which reward members of the community with $500 for going ‘above and beyond’ the call of duty to help others.

Jason, started his career at WBTW-TV in Florence, SC before moving to WALA-TV in Mobile, AL, was named the Associated Press Reporter of the Year in 2002.

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