Firefighters rescue woman stranded on Camelback Mountain in middle of night

Posted: Updated:
Phoenix and Tempe firefighters were able to safely remove a 22-year-old woman off of Camelback Mountain overnight. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Phoenix and Tempe firefighters were able to safely remove a 22-year-old woman off of Camelback Mountain overnight. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
The woman, along with her friend Dane Landis, became stranded on Camelback Mountain after what they were expecting was going to be a "routine day". (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) The woman, along with her friend Dane Landis, became stranded on Camelback Mountain after what they were expecting was going to be a "routine day". (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Thankfully, no firefighters were injured and Hannah was unscathed as well. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Thankfully, no firefighters were injured and Hannah was unscathed as well. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
After Hannah was successfully rescued, she was reunited with her mother and friend, Landis. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) After Hannah was successfully rescued, she was reunited with her mother and friend, Landis. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

Phoenix and Tempe firefighters were able to safely remove a 22-year-old woman off of Camelback Mountain overnight, according to Capt. Larry Subervi.

The woman, along with her friend Dane Landis, became stranded on Camelback Mountain after what they were expecting was going to be a "routine day".

"We just wanted to go out and enjoy the nice Arizona mountain that it offers," said Landis. "Tried to maneuver our way down, before we knew it, it turned into a nightmare."

Landis, and his friend, who he identified as Hannah, started hiking around 5 p.m. without their cell phones and after enjoying the top for a bit, began to hike down.

They lost the trail and began climbing down the other side of the mountain. They eventually got to a point where the ground was about 40 to 50 feet away and became stuck.

Luckily, after yelling for help, they got the attention of a homeowner nearby.

"I walked up to bring in the garbage can, I heard some kids, I went over to check it out and they were yelling down that they were stuck and can't get down," said Frank Isom. "I thought they were kidding and I walked over and sure enough they were stuck on the side of the mountain."

After Hannah asked him, Isom called her mother to reassure her of Hannah's whereabouts and safety. He also drove his truck around and shined his light on them so they could see.

It was at this point Landis traversed the mountain to reach Isom to get help and supplies.

"I told her, Hannah, I am coming back for you, I am coming back with help. I am not leaving you here," said Landis.

Landis wanted to climb back up to help his friend Hannah but decided it was best to leave it to the professionals after Isom called 911.

Phoenix and Tempe's rescue teams were able to safely remove Hannah by performing a "pick off" rescue, Subervi said.

During a pick off, a firefighter is lowered down by ropes to the patient and the patient is then "picked off", meaning Hannah was placed in a harness and then lowered the remainder of the way down.

Subervi said this type of rescue is very technical and at night can be challenging. Thankfully, no firefighters were injured and Hannah was unscathed as well.

After Hannah was successfully rescued, she was reunited with her mother and friend, Landis. 

Subervi advised that city parks are closed after the sun goes down and that people should not be hiking during this time of night. However, if someone does take this risk, they should be prepared with plenty of water and bring their cell phones.

"They did the right thing by stopping, calling for help," said Subervi. "Luckily, some people in the neighborhood heard them calling for help."

Landis said it was probably not the best idea to leave their cell phones and next time they will be better prepared.

Click/tap here to download the free azfamily mobile app.

Copyright 2017 KPHO/KTVK (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.