Gov't agency offers 'real time' data on opioid epidemic

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The Arizona Department of Health Services created a new dashboard about possible opioid overdoses and deaths that have been reported to the agency since June 15. (Source: azdhs.gov) The Arizona Department of Health Services created a new dashboard about possible opioid overdoses and deaths that have been reported to the agency since June 15. (Source: azdhs.gov)
As of Tuesday, there have been nearly 1,300 suspected opioid overdoses reported in Arizona, ADHS said. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) As of Tuesday, there have been nearly 1,300 suspected opioid overdoses reported in Arizona, ADHS said. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

A state government agency has just launched a new way people can keep track of the statistics surrounding the opioid epidemic and how it is impacting Arizona.

The Arizona Department of Health Services created a new dashboard about possible opioid overdoses and deaths that have been reported to the agency since June 15, which is when enhanced reporting went into effect thanks to an executive order.

[RELATED: Ducey follows opioid crisis declaration with reporting order]

The new dashboard breaks down the numbers by week. Users can also click on another link see a more in-depth breakdown of five categories ADHS is collecting.

As of Tuesday, there have been nearly 1,300 suspected opioid overdoses reported in Arizona, ADHS said.

[SPECIAL SECTION: Opioid crisis in Arizona]

Some additional data the dashboard highlights includes:

  • About 15 percent of people with suspect overdose cases had prior hospitalizations in 2016 for an opioid-related cause
  • Just less than half of people hospitalized with possible opioid overdose were referred to behavioral health services for treatment
  • The majority of suspect overdoses occurred at personal residences
  • 77 percent of people experiencing possible opioid overdoses had an opioid prescription one month prior to their recent overdose. A majority of those opioid prescriptions were written for six or more days.

ADHS also said law enforcement, emergency medical workers and other have administered 900 doses of naloxone, which is used to help those who have overdosed on opioids, since June 15.

[RELATED: Scottsdale officer uses Narcan to prevent opioid overdose death]

The agency said has ordered 2,258 naloxone kits for 25 agencies, and assisted many law enforcement agencies with information about how to set up a naloxone program. 

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