ADOT hopes high-tech checkpoints will keep truckers rolling along

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During the next month, the department will begin using a system called Drivewyze Preclear. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) During the next month, the department will begin using a system called Drivewyze Preclear. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Drivewyze Preclear uses cameras and sensors embedded in the roadway to scan trucks that subscribe to the service. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Drivewyze Preclear uses cameras and sensors embedded in the roadway to scan trucks that subscribe to the service. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
If the system detects an issue with a vehicle’s weight or paperwork, drivers will receive a notification on their smartphone or in-cab logging device to pull over for an inspection. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) If the system detects an issue with a vehicle’s weight or paperwork, drivers will receive a notification on their smartphone or in-cab logging device to pull over for an inspection. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
ADOT spokesman Tom Herrmann estimates the Drivewyze Preclear system will cut down on 95 percent of the in-person inspections at the upgraded checkpoints. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) ADOT spokesman Tom Herrmann estimates the Drivewyze Preclear system will cut down on 95 percent of the in-person inspections at the upgraded checkpoints. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
A map of where the Drivewyze Preclear system will be available at checkpoints. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) A map of where the Drivewyze Preclear system will be available at checkpoints. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
(3TV/CBS 5) -

The Arizona Department of Transportation will soon roll out sensor technology at seven commercial trucking checkpoints designed to keep the state’s trucking industry rolling along.

Traditionally, ADOT has relied on inspectors to evaluate the weight, credentials and safety status of trucks entering the state.

During the next month, the department will begin using a system called Drivewyze Preclear, which uses cameras and sensors embedded in the roadway to scan trucks that subscribe to the service.

If the system detects an issue with a vehicle’s weight or paperwork, drivers will receive a notification on their smartphone or in-cab logging device to pull over for an inspection. Some vehicles will also be randomly selected for an inspection.

ADOT spokesman Tom Herrmann estimates the Drivewyze Preclear system will cut down on 95 percent of the in-person inspections at the upgraded checkpoints.

“The trucking going across our state is a huge boost to the economy, so we want to create as few barriers as we can for trucks coming into our state,” Herrmann said.

More than 75 percent of the commodities delivered to Arizona, or exported from the state, are sent by truck.

Herrmann said the department will utilize fewer inspectors at each checkpoint under the new system, but he said ADOT has no plans to downsize its workforce.

Currently, the agency is unable to staff all of its checkpoints, he said, and the new system will allow ADOT to spread its inspectors out across more sites.

ADOT has been testing a similar system since 2015 near the McGuireville Rest Area on I-17, the Canoa Ranch Rest Area on I-19 and the Sacaton Rest Area on I-10.

The Drivewyze Preclear system will be available at the following checkpoints:

  • Interstate 8: Yuma
  • Interstate 10: Ehrenberg near the California line, and San Simon near the New Mexico line
  • Interstate 15: St. George, just north of the Arizona-Utah line
  • Interstate 40: Topock near the California line, and Sanders near the New Mexico line
  • State Route 68 and US 93: Kingman

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Derek StaahlDerek Staahl is an Emmy Award-winning reporter and fill-in anchor who loves covering stories that matter most to Arizona families.

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Derek Staahl

This once-uncompromising "California guy" got his first taste of Arizona in 2015 while covering spring training baseball for his former station. The trip spanned just three days, but Derek quickly decided Phoenix should be his next address. He joined CBS 5 and 3TV four months later, in August 2015. Before packing his bags for the Valley of the Sun, Derek spent nearly four years at XETV in San Diego, where he was promoted to Weekend Anchor and Investigative Reporter. Derek chaired the Saturday and Sunday 10 p.m. newscasts, which regularly earned the station's highest ratings for a news program each week. Derek’s investigative reporting efforts into the Mayor Bob Filner scandal in 2013 sparked a "governance crisis" for the city of San Diego and was profiled by the region’s top newspaper. Derek broke into the news business at WKOW-TV in Madison, WI. He wrote, shot, edited, and presented stories during the week, and produced newscasts on the weekends. By the end of his stint, he was promoted to part-time anchor on WKOW’s sister station, WMSN. Derek was born in Los Angeles and was named the “Undergraduate Broadcast Journalism Student of the Year” in his graduating class at USC. He also played quads in the school’s famous drumline. When not reporting the news, Derek enjoys playing drumset, sand volleyball, and baseball.

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