The monsoon monster beetle

Posted: Updated:
A Palo Verde Beetle spotted in a pool. (Source: Arizona Adventures) A Palo Verde Beetle spotted in a pool. (Source: Arizona Adventures)
They can measure up to 7 inches long and they can sort of fly. (Source: IGN.com) They can measure up to 7 inches long and they can sort of fly. (Source: IGN.com)
The bugs can end up on the windshield or a biker's helmet. (Source: The Detail Shop) The bugs can end up on the windshield or a biker's helmet. (Source: The Detail Shop)
They are found underground as white larvae, before coming out of the ground after the first rainfall. (Source: Orkin) They are found underground as white larvae, before coming out of the ground after the first rainfall. (Source: Orkin)
(3TV/CBS 5) -

I just cleaned one of these guys out of my pool this week - The Palo Verde Beetle! 

This is the time of year they start showing up in the Valley and they are freaking a lot of people out. 

Once the monsoon starts, these huge beetles come out of the ground looking for love and they are huge.  

[SPECIAL SECTION: Monsoon 2017]

They can measure up to 7 inches long and they can FLY! Since they are so huge, they are horrible fliers and make a mess on windshields and bikers helmets.   

[READ MORE: Palo Verde beetles return with the humidity]

They start out their lives eating the roots of a Palo Verde tree for two to four years. They are found underground as white larvae, before coming out of the ground after the first rainfall. The larvae can get up to 5” long and they are a favorite snack for bears in the woods.

[SPECIAL SECTION: Weather blog]

They come out of the ground looking their best and looking for love. The mature beetles don’t eat. They rely on their energy reserves to get around. Once they find a lover, they crawl back under ground to lay their eggs and then they die.   

Be careful this time of year walking around barefoot. I have a neighbor that stepped on one without his shoes on and he is still haunted by the experience.

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