Breakthrough medical device acts like a band-aid for the human heart

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Arizona scientists are calling this breakthrough medical device a "game changer".  Scientists have been working on this beating heart patch for years, it's called MyCardia. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Arizona scientists are calling this breakthrough medical device a "game changer". Scientists have been working on this beating heart patch for years, it's called MyCardia. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
"This is a one-time application," said Steven Goldman, chief medical officer of Avery Therapeutics. "We put this on the heart, patient walks out the door and bingo, theoretically or potentially they're done, treatment is over with." (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) "This is a one-time application," said Steven Goldman, chief medical officer of Avery Therapeutics. "We put this on the heart, patient walks out the door and bingo, theoretically or potentially they're done, treatment is over with." (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
"Our product is actually unique in that it can be handled really easily by the surgeon and deployed through a robotic or minimally invasive procedure," said Jordan Lancaster, Ph.D., Avery Therapeutics. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) "Our product is actually unique in that it can be handled really easily by the surgeon and deployed through a robotic or minimally invasive procedure," said Jordan Lancaster, Ph.D., Avery Therapeutics. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

Arizona scientists are calling this breakthrough medical device a "game changer".

Scientists have been working on this beating heart patch for years, it's called MyCardia.

MyCardia was developed with Nobel prize winning technology and will one day be placed on human hearts suffering from heart failure by the year 2020.

"This is a one-time application," said Steven Goldman, chief medical officer of Avery Therapeutics. "We put this on the heart, patient walks out the door and bingo, theoretically or potentially they're done, treatment is over with."

Medical scientists call this cutting edge technology a "band aid for the broken heart." A piece of mesh covered with living heart tissue is placed over a failing heart and regenerates heart cells. The hope is the patient would never have to have a transplant.

MyCardia can be pulled out of a freezer and within 20 minutes, be placed by a surgeon on a human heart.

"Our product is actually unique in that it can be handled really easily by the surgeon and deployed through a robotic or minimally invasive procedure," said Jordan Lancaster, Ph.D., Avery Therapeutics.

"The treatments of heart failure don't address the underlying problem," said Goldman. "Our treatment puts new heart cells back on the heart. It's the only real treatment that does that, short of a heart transplant."

Right now, 26 million people suffer from heart failure. The problem is, there are only 5,000 heart transplants worldwide and the transplant list continues to grow.

"A lot of people in the State of Arizona, these are older individuals and people are retiring here," said Lancaster. "So people right here in this community are people that we're going to potentially be able to save their lives."

Before that can happen, more money needs to be raised for clinical trials and then approved by the FDA.

If everything goes according to plan, real world use will begin in 2020.

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