House passage of immigration bills receives praise

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Mary Ann Mendoza spoke with us from D.C., she was there this week to launch AVIAC which stands for Advocates for Victims of Illegal Alien Crime. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Mary Ann Mendoza spoke with us from D.C., she was there this week to launch AVIAC which stands for Advocates for Victims of Illegal Alien Crime. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
"It was really a great victory for all of us, you know who have been fighting this illegal immigration, illegal aliens in our country," said Mary Ann Mendoza. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) "It was really a great victory for all of us, you know who have been fighting this illegal immigration, illegal aliens in our country," said Mary Ann Mendoza. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

On Thursday two pieces of immigration legislation passed the U.S. House of Representatives. One would put federal funding at risk for law enforcement agencies in sanctuary cities. The second, 'Kate's Law,' would increase penalties for undocumented immigrants who return to the U.S. unlawfully after being deported.

"It was really a great victory for all of us, you know, who have been fighting this illegal immigration, illegal aliens in our country," said Mary Ann Mendoza.

Mary Ann Mendoza spoke with us from D.C. She was there this week to launch AVIAC which stands for Advocates for Victims of Illegal Alien Crime.

[RELATED: House GOP backs bills to crack down on illegal immigration]

"These are all the things we've been fighting for and hoping our politicians would follow through and do the things they need to do to protect Americans," she said.

For Mendoza, it is personal.

Her son, Mesa Police Officer Brandon Mendoza, was killed three years ago by an undocumented immigrant with a criminal record in a wrong-way crash.

"It's a pain that will never go away, Brandon was an integral part of my life and the community," said Mendoza.

[READ MORE: Arizona Senate rejects measure targeting immigrants]

[MORE: Mom of Mesa officer killed by undocumented immigrant launches group for crime victims]

Kate's Law is named for Kate Seinle. She was murdered two years ago, allegedly by a man with a criminal record who had been deported several times.

As is, it would increase the maximum penalties from two years to five years for undocumented immigrants who return unlawfully to the U.S. after being deported and the maximums also increase for those with criminal records.

"I think it's important that when these criminals are deported they do have to face a maximum five years when they come back in the country automatically," Mendoza said.

[RELATED: Wrong-way driver hit, killed off-duty Mesa officer]

Both bills are now headed to the Senate.

Kate's Law was introduced before but it failed to get the votes needed to advance last year.

Mendoza ended her interview on a personal note saying, "I just want to say to my fellow Americans, it is time to stop protecting illegal criminals and illegal aliens in our country. We have got to come together as a country again and start caring about our fellow Americans and that's really the message that I want to get out."

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