Cox latest internet provider to no longer offer unlimited data

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Cox Communications sent out a notice this week to let high-speed internet users know there will soon be a cap placed on monthly service plans. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Cox Communications sent out a notice this week to let high-speed internet users know there will soon be a cap placed on monthly service plans. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Dean Markowitz of Scottsdale learned about changes to his internet account through an e-mail and is skeptical about the changes. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Dean Markowitz of Scottsdale learned about changes to his internet account through an e-mail and is skeptical about the changes. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Starting July 6, if users go over their 1 TB data allotment, they will be charged an extra $10 dollars for more data. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Starting July 6, if users go over their 1 TB data allotment, they will be charged an extra $10 dollars for more data. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
NEAR SCOTTSDALE, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -

A number of internet providers in Arizona and across the country are no longer providing unlimited data to their customers.

Cox Communications sent out a notice this week to let high-speed internet users know there will soon be a cap placed on monthly service plans.

Dean Markowitz of Scottsdale learned about changes to his internet account through an e-mail.

"I was a little annoyed," said Markowitz. "I think it's a little egregious and just another way for them to get their hand in your pocket."

The retired police officer is one of many Arizona customers raising concerns about the changes with their Cox high-speed internet service.

Starting July 6, if users go over their 1 TB data allotment, they will be billed an extra $10 for more data.

Cox customers will be given a two-month grace period, so they won't be charged an overage fee until October.

"Now you're dealing with a finite amount of data, and now you have to wonder in the back of your mind - I'm streaming a bunch of stuff, am I going over my limit?" said Markowitz. "It's just another thing to worry about."

Among the questions Cox customers have been asking:

  • Will doing away with unlimited data impact the number of movies they can stream on Netflix?
  • Will it affect the games they can play?
  • What about music and videos downloads?

 A Cox spokesperson said most customers won't be affected and released this statement.

"We have seen internet usage doubling every two years, and while everyone is getting more from their internet connection, 98 percent of Cox High Speed Internet customers do not come close to exceeding the amount of data included in their plan every month."

"By the year 2020, Americans are expected to have an average of 50 devices connected to the internet.  As data usage patterns change over time, data service plans also need to evolve to serve changing market needs." 

"Additionally, an overwhelming majority of data is consumed by a very small percentage of Internet users.  It makes sense that the two percent of users that consume significantly more data than allocated by their service plan should be notified of their overage so they can reevaluate their usage."

Even with the new data limit, Cox internet users can still do this every month: 

  • Watch 140 two-hour HD movies
  • Watch 300 half-hour standard definition TV shows
  • Watch 1,500 three-minute videos
  • Surf the web for 3,000 hours 
  • Listen to 30,000 songs that are four minutes long each

Markowitz remains a little skeptical.

"I don't know if I am buying it will only affect 2 percent," said Markowitz. "I'm not sure I believe them when they said that."

Other internet providers like AT&T and Comcast have already established caps on internet data in other states.

Cox also plans to send customers an alert when they reach 85 percent of their monthly data allotment.

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Jason Barry
Jason Barry has been reporting in the Valley since 1997.

Click to learn more about Jason.

Jason Barry

Jason Barry has been reporting in the Valley since 1997.

He is a nine-time Rocky Mountain Emmy Award winner who is best known for his weekly Dirty Dining reports, which highlight local restaurants with major health code violations.

Jason was born in Los Angeles and graduated from the University of Miami.

An avid sports fan, Jason follows the Diamondbacks, Cardinals and Suns with his wife, Karen, and son, Joshua.

His favorite stories to cover are the station’s Pay it Forward segments, which reward members of the community with $500 for going ‘above and beyond’ the call of duty to help others.

Jason, started his career at WBTW-TV in Florence, SC before moving to WALA-TV in Mobile, AL, was named the Associated Press Reporter of the Year in 2002.

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