Firefighters preach precaution to avoid a 4th firework fiasco

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The fireworks that are legal are the ones that don't go airborne or don't deliver report. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) The fireworks that are legal are the ones that don't go airborne or don't deliver report. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Sparklers, showers, pop-it's are all completely acceptable during the permissible times of the year. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Sparklers, showers, pop-it's are all completely acceptable during the permissible times of the year. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
If you're planning to skip the tents because you have some leftovers laying around, you may want to think twice before you set them off. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) If you're planning to skip the tents because you have some leftovers laying around, you may want to think twice before you set them off. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
MESA, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -

When it comes to fireworks, there's a lot of do's and don'ts to keep in compliance with state law.

"There are certain fireworks that are legal. Those are the ones that don't go airborne or don't deliver report, essentially don't explode," said Deputy Chief Forrest Smith with Mesa Fire and Medical Department.

Sparklers, showers, pop-it's are all completely acceptable during the permissible times of the year.

Aerial fireworks that explode are illegal except as part of a permitted public display.

Deputy Chief Smith says the illegal fireworks have the potential to light up your or your neighbors' Fourth in all the wrong ways.

"We don't want anybody to use these types of fireworks mainly because of the chance for property damage and of course injury," Deputy Chief Smith said.

Most of the fireworks sold at the tents around the Valley are legal but if you're planning to skip the tents because you have some leftovers lying around, you may want to think twice before you set them off.

"If you have any that are old, we surely can't predict how those are going to react once you light them on fire so those may be ones that you may want to dispose of. Best way, of course, is to soak them in water," Smith said.

That is just one precaution to take because setting off fireworks is inherently risky, even the legal ones.

Dr. Frank LoVecchio from Banner University Medical Center says firework-related injuries are all too common this time of year because fireworks are more readily available.

"More likely than not, our emergency departments here in the Valley will have people with firework injuries," Dr. LoVecchio said.

It's an issue that is personal to him. The ER physician suffered a serious injury at the age of 13 during a Fourth of July celebration.

"Foolish, young kid playing around with fireworks and I'll just say it exploded a little too quickly," said LoVecchio.

The impact blew off three of his fingers. Only two were able to be reattached. To this day, he has continued issues with his grip.

"These fireworks are not foolproof," he said. "Sometimes you have a bad one, sometimes you think you have a dud and it explodes on you."

Both LoVecchio and the deputy chief said the best way to avoid any potential mishaps is to leave the fireworks to the professionals and take in one of the many Valley displays instead.

[READ MORE: Red, white and blue celebrations light up the Valley]

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