American Airlines alerting Phoenix passengers of potential heat related delays

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American Airlines sent customers a notice warning them that the high temperatures from Monday to Wednesday between 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. may "impact flight operations, specifically regional flights that operate on smaller aircraft." (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) American Airlines sent customers a notice warning them that the high temperatures from Monday to Wednesday between 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. may "impact flight operations, specifically regional flights that operate on smaller aircraft." (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
American Airlines is also giving those customers who have scheduled flights on those days and time the opportunity to change their flights without a fee. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) American Airlines is also giving those customers who have scheduled flights on those days and time the opportunity to change their flights without a fee. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

The extreme heat in the forecast for Phoenix this week could impact travel plans.

American Airlines sent customers a notice warning them that the high temperatures from Monday to Wednesday between 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. may "impact flight operations, specifically regional flights that operate on smaller aircraft."

They also are giving those customers who have scheduled flights on those days and time the opportunity to change their flights without a fee.

[RELATED: 3 reasons why Arizona's heat wave will delay vacations]

"If you are scheduled to arrive and/or depart Phoenix during this time period, we recommend you change to an earlier or later flight, or connect via a different city, in order to avoid any disruption to your travel plans," the notice states.

Aviation expert Jim Tilmon says he doesn't anticipate the heat will force a grounding of commercial airliners flying in or out of Sky Harbor, saying the FAA has certified the aircraft for these extreme temperatures. 

"There's no reason for the airplane not to be able to go," Tilmon said.

Still, he says navigating the extreme elements, particularly the thinner air, does require additional consideration.

[SPECIAL SECTION: Extreme heat]

"The heavier you are the more runway you take, the more thrust it takes, the more difficult it is to get off the ground, etc., etc. and you still have the challenge of what its like to handle the airplane in the air," said Tilmon.

When it comes to warning passengers of potential delays, Tilmon says its always a good idea to keep customers informed of what's going on.

"It was smarter to give the public that heads up now even though I don't anticipate that there will be an problem whatsoever," he said.

When we hit 122 degree in 1990, Sky Harbor had to ground flights. But it was not because the asphalt was melting, it was a certification and instrument issue, something that has been remedied.

"The airplanes will function just fine they function just fine in the deserts of the Middle East and they'll do the same here in Sky Harbor," said Tilmon.

Anyone who has to fly during this extreme heatwave should check their flight status before heading to the airport. 

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